Optimizing Your Health and Making the Entrepreneurial Leap with Emil Hodzovic

Emil is a medical doctor turned coach, turned entrepreneur, and investor. What began as a scripted path into medicine took a turn as he realized that practicing medicine wasn’t solving patients’ health problems as thoroughly as he would like. He embarked on a personal and professional journey to redefine his work.

Today Emil spends his time across a few of his ventures, as well as traveling, training, and seeking to live a full life. I left this interview feeling inspired. And I think you will too.

As well as building businesses he loves traveling, training, eating good food and striving for a peak life.


Listen in here:

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In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What Emil does
  • Why people get stressed about health
  • How he ended up in this field
  • Why he got into coaching 
  • His transitional journey
  • The importance of shifting identity
  • How to navigate family responses to career change 
  • How to manage family expectations
  • How he discovered making money online
  • The importance of goals
  • Mental and physical health tips

Resources Mentioned:

Emil’s Website

Emil’s Instagram

Software Generated Transcription:

Dan

Emil, thank you so much for joining me. Welcome to the Meaning Movement podcast.

Emil

Dan, thank you so much for having me.

Dan

So the question I always like to begin with is how do you begin to talk talk about the work that you do.

Emil

Yeah. So it’s an interesting and very expansive question. But I am an entrepreneur, currently entrepreneur and investor. I have a few businesses in the health space, and my background is basically as a medical doctor. And that’s probably a good place to start because then we can go in any of a million different directions.

Dan

I love it. Before we get into the backstory, can you give me a breakdown of what entrepreneurship looks like for you? What are some of the ventures that you have your hands in right now?

Emil

Yeah. So it all started with coaching, health coaching, essentially. And that’s kind of grown from me coaching people selfemployed to employing a team, having coaches who do most of the coaching. So it’s become a business. I then also have a supplement company. We’re mainly on Amazon in the US. And then I also mentor other fitness professionals in building their own coaching businesses. So those are the main areas that I’m in, I suppose, business, entrepreneurship wise.

Dan

Yeah, I love it. Yeah. How do you define health coaching? What is that for someone who’s less familiar with that field? How would you define that? Yeah.

Emil

So Funnily enough, I’ve never decided what I want to call myself. It’s not a nutritionist, it’s not a health coach. It’s not a life coach. I don’t even know how to kind of define it or name it. But essentially what I’m looking to do and this is what I do with myself is get people to a level of health where whatever marker, they decide to use a certain body shape, their blood tests are normal, they’re fit enough to do what they want to do day to day in their lives. So they’re healthy by whatever definition. And then this is put on autopilot so that it facilitates them living the life that they want to live. So it places health as a facilitator as opposed to an end all. And it also adds mental health to that because a lot of people get very stressed about health, either because they’re not healthy and they’re stressed about disease or because they’re healthy. But it’s taking up a lot of bandwidth. They’re worried about carbs, they’re worried about exercise. If they don’t exercise, they feel bad. So I also try to remove that because that is not a lot healthy.

Emil

So it’s about building health by we can define it for individuals and then putting it on autopilot so people can fulfill their potential and live their life according to their values.

Dan

I love that. I love that so much. And I love how individual it is that health for one person is going to look different than health for another person, both because of their lifestyle and their goals and how they want to live their life. And also because bodies are different, and that’s really fantastic. Love it. So just to rewind, how did you get here? How did this end up as your current iteration of your work? Where did it begin? Maybe that’s a better place to start.

Emil

Yeah. So I always start this story at 14-15 years old, deciding what I wanted to do in life, which is a ridiculous concept. 14 year olds deciding what they’re going to do for their whole lives. And my family are Serbian. I was born in Serbia. So first generation immigrants to the UK. And in that kind of culture, it’s doctor, lawyer or don’t bother.

Right?

Emil

So it’s get an education, get a job, good job, blah, blah, whatever. And I was fine. I was open to that. I was like, I don’t need to think about anything. I just get into University, get a job, and my life is laid out in front of me. So I was very open to that. So I became a doctor and I started working as a doctor. And throughout I have this background in health. I was working in gyms. I was doing qualifications just because I was interested in it. I did a sports science degree as well. Again, just because I was interested in it, started working as a doctor. I did that for four years, full time, and then realized that one, modern healthcare wasn’t doing what I wanted it to do. It wasn’t fixing the core of the problem, which is lifestyle essentially. It was just putting bandaids on it. You’ve had a heart attack. Have aspirin not. You’ve had a heart attack. Let’s totally transform your life. Your nutrition, your exercise, your sleep, your stress. It doesn’t have the bandwidth or capacity to do that, but that’s not what I wanted to do. And then I also personally wanted more freedom for myself.

Emil

I didn’t want to be told what to do. I didn’t want to be working long shift. I didn’t want politics and bureaucracy. So in 2015, I left medicine. And given my background, it was most obvious for me to become a coach, a health coach, nutrition coach, whatever. I did that for a number of years, slowly building various businesses, failing with most of them. And then in 2017, I had a moment where I kind of realized that you could make a lot of money on the Internet. And then 2019, things started to kind of really kick off. And that’s why I’m a health coach. So it’s almost I fell into health coaching. It’s again, a tool, a means to an end, as opposed to my life’s passion and dream. But it’s something I love doing. And, yeah, that’s how I’m here, essentially.

Dan

I love it. Thank you for that overview. Just to zoom in on a couple of moments, you said that it made the most sense for you to move into coaching what do you mean by the most sense? Because of your background, because of the opportunities available to you or some combination of those?

Emil

Yes, all of the above. Essentially, I was very qualified to be a health coach because I had a medical degree. I had a sports science degree, I had personal training qualifications. I’d worked with people in the past. I was more qualified than most. I also enjoyed that area and it was a very easy way. It’s such an unregulated industry. Anyone can pitch up and become a coach. The fact that I had qualifications was a bonus. So I could start working the day I left medicine, I could start posting on Instagram and start taking on clients. And I had a community of people around me who were also in this area so they could mentor me and help me. And that’s how I basically started. So it was convenience and it made sense at the time and I didn’t know any different.

Dan

Yeah. And I’m curious for you, as you made that shift from doctor, and I know a lot of doctors by nature, professionally, a lot of times it can require some degree of entrepreneurial skills if you’re running your own practice and those kinds of things that I’m curious for you, that shift from “I am a doctor” to “I’m a coach and an entrepreneur” and just that identity piece and how that went for you.

Emil

So certainly in the UK, it’s a lot less entrepreneurial. Most doctors work for the governments and they don’t need any business sense. It’s a very secure job. You never need to worry about being sick or retirement. It’s all taken care of, which was the appeal for me as a teenager, for whatever reason. So I didn’t know what entrepreneurism was. And that event in 2017 was where my eyes were kind of opened in terms of the identity. Interestingly, so I kept working as a doctor between 2015 and 19 in the kind of slowly transitioning out kind of way. I worked in Er. There’s always lots of work there. I could pick up shifts and do my other stuff around it. So I transitioned out slowly. But Interestingly, I almost divorced myself from the identity as a doctor because what I saw was a lot of doctors being doctors and pretending to do things on the side, but not really. They just kind of said, I’m a personal trainer, but they didn’t have any clients. They said, I do this, but they didn’t really, because being a doctor takes up all of your time. So for me, I wanted to be like, no, I’m an actual coach.

Emil

Like, I make money, the doctor is the side hustle. So I kind of divorced myself from that field entirely. And then over time, people were like, being a doctor is pretty good for marketing. So then I went back the full circle and owned it again. But for a number of years, I kind of suppressed it and hid it and didn’t really talk about it because I was like, no, I’m a real coach. I’m not a pretend one.

Dan

Yeah. I love it. I love how you went there and then flipped it back. I think that really highlights how useful identity can be as a tool to use to take us where we want to go. And often we think of it in reverse. That identity follows action, but really they go hand in hand. And I think what you did in those moments is to switch your identity in order to lead your action and then switch it back, which is just really cool. And I think a really helpful example for people that are listening

Emil

Just to jump in there as well.

Emil

So identity shift is hard. And I’d actually had practice a number of times in the past. So I played rugby for I don’t know, since I was nine. I grew up in Wales until I was maybe 23. And when I stopped playing rugby, that was the most jarring identity shift. It was the first one. So that was my practice. And then I did strongman for a brief period, two or three years, and then I was the strongest guy in the gym, and then I wasn’t anymore. So that was another identity crash. I had practice in shifting my identity a number of times. And it gets easier over time the more you do it Unsurprisingly. Right. But, yeah, that’s a point.

Dan

I love it. Yes. Great. That’s super helpful. Just highlighting that this wasn’t your first time you’ve practiced it, which is great. I imagine you’ll continue to practice it.

Emil

Exactly. I’m almost transitioning again now, so it’s nice to be the kind of identity chameleon.

Dan

Yeah, that’s great. Well, one of the things that I’m curious about, I think this ties in well with where we are in your story related to the identity piece is what you said about your background being Serbian, about you’re either a doctor or lawyer. And I know a lot of times with career transitions, a lot of times when we think about these big words like calling and vocation, what are we going to do with our lives? There’s so many voices that cloud the space, especially when it comes to culture, especially when it comes to family, especially when it comes to organizations we’re a part of institutions we’re a part of religions we’re a part of all those things. There are so many forces that are basically trying to tell us who we need to be and what we need to do. And you identify your family like doctor and lawyer. Those are the things you do. That’s a strong messaging. And I’m curious as you made the shift from doctor to at least as your paycheck coming from being a doctor to be coming from a coach, how you dealt with those voices, how you told the story to your family, if there’s anything of interest.

Dan

Anything to highlight there?

Emil

Yeah, 100%. So my family didn’t understand at all in the slightest. The only saving Grace was because I transitioned out and I kind of went from medical training to working in Er. They were like, this is just a phase. You’ll go back next year. This is just a two year phase. You’ll go back next year. This is just a three year phase. So they were kind of fed into it slowly, whereas I was like, I’m out, I’m on my way out. This is a one way street. They were like, he’ll go back. But even then, there was a lot of negative pressure out of love, no doubt, but nonetheless, negative pressure. They were projecting their own fears on me. I was struggling. I was trying to be a doctor. I was trying to run my businesses. I was trying to figure all this stuff out. I was on the edge. So I had to kind of excommunicate them for like six months where I just couldn’t speak to them because. And it wasn’t like a dramatic thing. It was just like I wasn’t returning calls. I was just like, look, I just can’t take any negativity, even if it’s out of love.

Emil

So that’s what I did for a period of time. And now we’re fine. Now they’re kind of six years later, they’re like, he hasn’t asked for money in six years. He’s probably okay, that’s great. He hasn’t been back to the UK in three years, four years. So he’s probably all right.

Dan

Yeah, he’s making it. I know in my own journey just on that. I was a pastor for a handful of years, and I still have family members that I’m an entrepreneur and have a handful of things that I do now but still call me a pastor. And I’ve just kind of accepted that. I don’t know that they’re ever going to shift that lens through which they see me. And I’m curious about if there’s some holdouts in your family.

Emil

I’m sure they still describe me to their friends as a doctor. I’m fairly certain of that. And that’s okay, I’m open to that. But then the other big kind of area where there was a lot of resistance was the medical field, the medical area. Once you become a doctor, you don’t leave. It’s a vocation. It’s a thing that you do. And especially these days, people are becoming more and more unhappy with it for the political reasons, bureaucratic reasons, litigation reasons, a lot of reasons. So when they see someone else trying to leave, they again, subconsciously, it’s like crabs in a bucket pulling each other down again.

Yeah.

Emil

I always likened it to a conveyor belt with walls on the side. Like, it’s really hard to get out and people make it harder again, not consciously, not overtly. Like, you shouldn’t leave, but you’re going to struggle to leave. Why would you even do that? That’s going to be really hard. What else to do doctors do. You’ve wasted the last ten years of your life, all this kind of stuff. It’s like when you’re on a diet and people are like, oh, you don’t need a diet. You look great as you are, like all this kind of stuff. So it’s again, out of concern, perhaps, but it just comes from their own fears and insecurities. And it didn’t serve me. So I had one friend who understood, and he was a doctor. He kind of helped me during those early years, 2014, 15-16. And really, he was like my cheerleader. He was a really strong support.

Dan

I love it. And he was a doctor as well.

Emil

So he was a doctor. He’s still a doctor. He’s fully into the doctor thing, but he understood what I was doing. He had insights, and I met him on Twitter. It’s that kind of like thing. And we’re still friends to this day.

Dan

Yeah. Well, I think what you’re saying that just highlights so much of what can be hard about these kinds of transitions that your friends and family, community, as you’re trying to iterate on who you are and become level up. I guess you could say sometimes it takes a change in community, a change in who you spend time with. Not that you need to drop all your friends, but maybe you shared less of yourself with certain friends and you find those few people that get it and lean into those relationships.

Emil

Yeah. You need to change your environment, as you say, slowly doesn’t have to be a slash and burn approach.

Dan

Yeah. Better not to, I think in a lot of ways. Yeah.

Emil

For sure.

Dan

In 2017, you said there’s this moment of clarity. And I’m curious for you just to hear a little bit more about what caused that moment of clarity when you realize that I think you said something about like that you could do your business online, take your business online. I’d love to hear more about that moment, that pivot and kind of that mindset shift that took place.

Emil

Yeah. So I call these quantum leaps where you make it’s not a linear growth, it’s a jump. It’s from one level to the next. So up until 2017, I was self employed as a coach. I was working as a doctor. My life was pretty comfortable, but I was wading through treacle. It was fine. But I also didn’t know any different. I was trying other things. I was failing. I didn’t really know what an entrepreneur was. I was self employed for all intents and purposes. And then I got a cold call from a guy who is a good friend of mine now in 2017, and he knew me because of a photographer I’ve worked with. And the local supplement shop mentioned my name. So he reached out to me and he said, I’m running an event in Italy for six guys. We’re just going to get together in a Villa and share ideas. There was a software engineer, there were two Amazon sellers, a dating coach, you’re the health coach, and a copywriter. Like a copywriter.

Yeah.

Emil

And I was like, Sounds interesting. Okay, fine, I’ll do it. I can only do three days. I can’t do before I need to get back. I have things to do next week. But I said yes. And that was pivotal in itself. And then I was at this event and these guys were making crazy money online. And I just never been exposed to this. I didn’t know it existed. I was within the constraints of, you work for your money, it’s time. You work X hours, you get X amount of money and you make a good, fair salary kind of thing. And these guys were just showing me, like, it was just insane. It was just crazy. And then that three day event, two of the guys there were like, we’d love you to coach us. How much do you charge? And I said, well, it’s £150 a month, $200. And they were like, okay, well, we’re going to pay you $1,000 each and we want you to coach us. And also there’s an event in Marbella from Italy to Spain in two weeks time, and we’re going to drive there. You should come. And I was just like, who are these people?

Emil

What is going on here? I just had zero comprehension.

Yes.

Emil

And I knew in that moment that if I said no to this trip, I was saying no to everything I wanted in life but didn’t know I wanted. And it was hard. I had to cancel medical ship. I was speaking at an event. I had to cancel that. I had to change my flights. I only had a rucksack. I was only going to beat for three days. There was so much friction. But I knew if I said no and I didn’t make this happen, it would have been a totally different life. I wouldn’t be where I was now.

Wow.

Emil

I didn’t expect to spend three weeks of hotels being on the road, eating out. I mean, I was well off, but I wasn’t loaded. So I was hosing cash. And it was just insane. We arrived in Marbella two weeks later after spending two weeks with these guys who I’d met three days prior. And there was an event of Amazon sellers. So 30 more guys staying in one of the guys villas and another Villa nearby. And we just started doing crazy stuff. We were hiring Supercars, we were doing yachts, we were doing jet skis, we were getting dinghies into beach clubs and then having these crazy meals. And it was like a trance for four days. I didn’t know what was happening. I was hosing money. I was just saying yes to everything. The guys, they were paying me $1,000, but they haven’t paid me anything at this point. So I was like, this could be an absolute disaster. But I know I need to do it. I’m terrified. Yes. So you can see that this was the kind of the jarring event, the jarring opportunity that put me on a totally different trajectory, set me up for 2018 to take certain actions.

Emil

And this is why I’m here now. And that guy Phil is the very close friends with him now is the instigator of all of this.

Dan

Wow. I love it. I mean, in some ways it sounds like a movie or maybe a dream. Right. Like the kind of thing that sounds like you could come back from and be like, did that actually happen?

Emil

That was it exactly, that was it exactly. What the hell just happened?

Dan

Yeah. It sounds like also that it just exposed you to a whole different way of thinking about what is possible for you. Of course, like all the tactical of how people were building their businesses and all those kinds of things. But I feel like the bigger thing is just the inspirational, the higher level, like, wow, more is possible than you ever had imagined previously.

Emil

Yeah. It was just exposure. There was tactic to discussed, but those were almost irrelevant. Certainly in hindsight, it was all about seeing what was possible, expanding my mind. And then I figured out how to fill it. And to be honest, I didn’t see any more success for at least twelve to 18 months. But the actions that I took in 2018 and 19 were built on that event in 2017.

Dan

Oh, man, that’s so good. Such a great point. And I recently went through a phase of where I felt like I was a quantum leap, I think is the word that you use. I felt like I was kind of getting this exposure, feeling like I was in some ways being called to level up, and then a lot of things were kind of coming together all at once, and then they all resolved in a lot of ways. But then I feel like my life has been still a lot the same, and I haven’t known what to do with integrating that experience into my everyday life. So even just hearing your story is really inspirational to me to know that it won’t even necessarily all equate to change right away, but that there’s this trickle down effect that maybe takes a little bit more time. So thank you. Thank you for that. That’s really helpful.

Emil

It’s a pleasure. You’ll call it a quantum leap in hindsight, you won’t know at the time.

Dan

Yeah, that is great because it doesn’t feel as much like a quantum lead. It feels more like this crazy thing happened. And what do I do with it?

Emil

100%? Exactly.

Dan

Yeah. So, yeah, I can see how that we can tie these threads, connect these themes back to that shift, and that’s brought you to where you are now. As you think about the projects that you’re working on, your coaching business, your supplements, all of that, how do you think about work and meaning and fulfillment when it comes to all the things you have your hands in right now. And whether we use words like vocation or calling, whatever words you use, use whatever words fit your vernacular.

Emil

Yeah. No, for sure. So initially, I was running away. I was running away from my previous life as a doctor, and that was my sole and only motivation. I wanted to make enough money to not have to be a doctor, to not have to live in the UK, to travel around the world and to be secure and stable. Because I had a stable base as a doctor, I didn’t have to think about anything. So that’s what I wanted to rebuild. And then in 2021, this year, I achieved all of that. Half of it was mindset, half of it was kind of resources and assets. But once I achieved that, I just felt this, like, emptiness, this hollowness of now what. And that’s when I kind of realized the coaching I did, because I’m good at it, I love it. And it was a path out of medicine. But it’s not the end game. So this is what I’ve been working on hard this year is figuring out what the end game is and moving from operating out of fear to operating out of gratitude and abundance, I suppose, and living in the moment, enjoying the moment, living life and allowing it to happen.

Emil

So then lead me to whatever needs to happen. I don’t know what the next step is. I don’t know what the answer is, what my passion is, what my calling is. But living in the moment is kind of living to my values. That’s what I’m trying to do. Moment to moment. I’m confident that I’ll go where I need to go.

Dan

I love it. I think that calling is a lived thing and it sounds like you are doing it even if you don’t at this moment have the words for it is often also something that, again, similar to that quantum leap that you can identify in hindsight. I think that the same is true of some of these concepts, that sometimes it’s best understood by looking back at it than kind of being in it. It can be challenging. So I love that for people that are listening and maybe they’re at a place where similar to where you were when you were a doctor, and maybe they’re not satisfied with what they’re doing, but they’re looking for a change. I think this describes a fair amount of our listening demographic. They’re all looking for something more. I think that’s why they hit play on this show is they’re looking for inspiration, they’re looking for a road map of sorts and whatever, knowing that there isn’t a one for one road map out there. But they feel stuck and they’re not sure what to do next. And I’m curious if you have any words of wisdom or encouragement that you would offer to people that are in that kind of a situation.

Emil

Yeah, for sure. So if you feel stuck, if you are not happy, you need to take action. And what I like to do is I like to do a thought experiment where I Journal and I say, what would be an obscene massive action I could take to mix things up. And it doesn’t mean I’m going to do that, like quit my job, move countries, whatever. It doesn’t mean I’m going to do that. But once you define that, you give yourself a lot of space for everything in between. So you can then start to think in such a way.

Okay.

Emil

So if I’m not going to pack everything in, sell my house and move countries, what can I do in between? What actions can I take? And then the other thing to do is just to define some sort of goal for what you want from your life. And this is the single most important thing. And this is the thing that people say, yeah, that’s a great idea. And then never do it. And you just need to do it. It’s going to be imperfect, it’s going to be wrong. It doesn’t matter. You just need something to set a direction for this action which you’re going to take. You start moving towards it, you will then cause correct and iterate as new things come up. But without this initial goal, you will Bumble around and suddenly it’ll be ten years later, nothing will have changed. So you need to start it’s basically pick a direction and start moving. And the bigger action you can take, the more likely it is to happen.

Dan

I love it. That’s such good advice. My wife and I, as we talk about concepts like this, we use the phrase that momentum is messy. You’re going to have to kind of mess things up. You can’t have a perfect plan. I think that sometimes one of the components of that stuck feeling is fear that we’re not going to move in the correct direction or move towards the correct goal, or that we don’t even have the most perfect plan possible, which then keeps us from ever taking action. And what I hear you inviting people to is just take action. It won’t be right even. But just the fact that you’re taking it is what’s going to get you moving. And then you can iterate and then you can course-correct, which is fantastic. So thank you. Yeah, so much for that. It’s so good. Selfishly. I’m curious. Something my wife and I also talk about is health and aging and staying healthy. So I think this is a little bit of a selfish question, but I want to ask you, since this is your realm and I’m sure listeners are there too. We’re all aging no matter what age everyone is.

Dan

And I’m curious what the low hanging fruit is. If there are some things as to how to stay healthy, how to maintain health, how to age well when it comes to living a healthy life. Yeah.

Emil

So this is a great question. And the way I approach it is very pragmatically. So I take every intervention imaginable and I stack them in order of efficacy, effectiveness, impact, whatever you want to call it, bang for your buck. And then I start implementing from the top. So the most impactful thing and I ignore everything else to the point that people think I’m a bit crazy or reductionist or whatever they’re like, well, what about XYZ? And it’s like, look, I’m focusing on this first thing. Once it’s built on autopilot, I’ll focus on the next thing. And this way you start to build this identity, these behaviors, these habits. And over time you become this different person. And if you try to do everything at once, if you try to go from zero to 100, then you will fail. Which is why you’re interested in the answer to this question. So what you need to do is just take a super slow, super long term approach and just say, okay, what am I going to do this week? And this is a fluffy answer to give you some more concrete stuff. The four domains I look at nutrition, exercise, sleep, and stress.

Emil

With nutrition, you want to be a roughly healthy body weight. And again, that’s a broad definition. Roughly healthy body weight doesn’t need to be a six pack. Just healthy body weight, eating protein and vegetables. And that’s about it. In terms of nutrition, like anything beyond that is my new ship is Optimization, which we don’t need to worry about yet. In terms of exercise, movement, regular movement, find something you enjoy. Do it regularly. Try not to sit for 8 hours in one go. Try to get up and walk around again. If you’re not doing that yet, that’s what you need to focus on next. Sleep, you need to be sleeping seven and a half hours. If you’re in bed for seven and a half hours, you’re only sleeping six. So again, this is something that you really need to fix because there’s no point in eating a quinoa smoothie bowl if you’re sleeping 4 hours a night because that is killing you quicker than the food you’re eating. So nail the sleep. And then with stress, if you’re super stressed all the time, that is killing you. That’s what you need to figure out. And to be honest, if people can figure out the 80, 20 of those four, you’re 80 or 90% away.

Emil

You’re optimized.

Dan

Like, that is everything. I love it.

Emil

And then beyond that you can optimize to the moon, you can play, you can do whatever. But I’ve not really ever gone beyond the 8020 because I just don’t need to.

Dan

I love it. That’s fantastic. And I think a really helpful framework for people to think through. And I would challenge listeners to think through those four domains and check in with yourself and how you’re doing and all of those. Because I think health is one of those things that like you either use it, use your body and keep your body healthy or you lose it, right? So to get these things lined up and healthy, now is the time. So thank you. Thank you for that challenge. It’s been so fun to dig in with you and I feel like you so resonate with your journey and these movements you’ve made. I feel like I could go on with you indefinitely, but just to honor the time and move towards wrapping up here first, just thank you so much for just sharing your story, sharing everything that you’re up to here with listeners. If people are wanting to follow along with you and track with your work, reach out, speak to you or whatever it might be. Is there any action steps that you’d like to invite people to?

Emil

Yeah, so best bet is follow along on Instagram, Dr. Emil official D-R-E-M-I-L official on Instagram and Twitter, and then my website is www.doctormeal.com, where I’ll be posting articles and things like that, but those are the best ways. It’s me on my social media. So if you drop me a DM and say hey, I will say hey back, and that’s where I kind of put my adventures and what I’m thinking of in the moment.

Dan

Beautiful. Well, I’m excited to follow along myself. I love health, fitness and movement, and so I think you’ll be a great addition to the voices that I follow. So thank you and thank you for coming along. I’ll make sure you’re put links to everything that you’re up to here in the show, notes to your Twitter, your Instagram and everything so people can just click on through and follow your work. Thank you so much for joining us here.

Emil

Absolute pleasure, really enjoy the conversation.

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