Networking and Career Management with Mac Prichard

Mac Prichard is a career expert, communications strategist and business owner. He holds a Master’s degree in public administration from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He believes in making a difference in communities through his service and relationships. 

Mac is the founder of Mac’s List — a platform to connect people to jobs in the Pacific Northwest with an emphasis on facilitating a more human hiring process. He started Mac’s List in 2001 —  informally at first — and went on to become a certified B Corporation in 2017. Today, it serves job seekers and employers as a regional job board that brings people together to find better jobs as well as helpful resources.

Mac is also the author of the book ‘Land Your Dream Job Anywhere’ and the host of a weekly podcast ‘Find Your Dream Job.’ 

Mac is also a long time internet friend of the Meaning Movement, having included us in his annual podcast round ups, featured Dan on his podcast, and much more over the years.


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In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What Mac does
  • Mac’s journey into entrepreneurship
  • Having a vision and knowing where you want to go
  • Mac’s motivations behind choosing to make a difference
  • Obstacles Mac faced in transitional phases
  • Starting Mac’s List

Resources Mentioned:

Mac’s List

Mac’s LinkedIn

Mac’s Tweeter

Software Generated Transcription:

Dan

Mac, thank you so much for joining me. Welcome to the Meaning Movement Podcast.

Mac

Well, thank you for having me as a guest, Dan. It’s a pleasure to be here.

Dan

The question I like to begin with is how do you begin to talk about the work that you do in the world?

Mac

Well, there are two ways to talk about about it. One is I can tell people what I do, which is that I run two small businesses. One is a regional job board that serves employers and job seekers in Oregon and Washington. The other is a public relations company that works with nonprofits, foundations and public agencies. But the other way I like to talk about it, Dan, is I’ve had a lot of different jobs in my career, and there’s a constant that runs through all of them and that’s wanting to make a difference about issues I care about or to make a difference in the community where I live and work. And I’ve been fortunate to have positions. And now two small businesses that allow me to do that.

Dan

I love it. Have you always been entrepreneurial? Has your path always taking you down an entrepreneurial with an entrepreneurial emphasis, or where did that emerge?

Mac

At the start of my career, I didn’t think of myself as an entrepreneur. When I got out of College, I wanted to do three things. I wanted to get paid to write. I wanted to work on election campaigns, and I wanted to do human rights advocacy in Latin America. And I thought the way to do those things was to find jobs with organizations working in those areas. And I was successful at doing that through my twentiess and thirties. I didn’t start my businesses until about 15 years ago. I started the public relations firm first, and while I was doing it, going out, setting up an office, hiring people, creating systems, getting customers, paying attention to budgets. It all felt very familiar to me, and it surprised me because I didn’t think of myself as somebody who would go out and start a business. In hindsight, I realized that all the things I was doing were steps that I had taken when I worked on political campaigns. So I’ve been involved in about a dozen or more different races from the local to even the presidential level. And all the things that you do on a campaign, and they often begin we’re very similar to starting your own business.

Mac

So campaign will often start with the candidate and a conversation around the kitchen table. You’ve got to raise money from family and friends, and then you start growing your network and looking for other donors. It’s just like finding customers. You’ve got to hire people, you’ve got to build systems, you’ve got to create an organization. And then in a campaign on election night, you know whether or not you’ve got a sale because you either win or you don’t. And when you do that whether you win or lose. If you work in that field, then you just shut it all down and you start all over again and again. I’ve been through that process about a dozen times. And like startups, if you run a good campaign and you’re good at what you do, even if you lose an election or one or two or even more, there’s no stigma attached to it, just as finding the startup world if you execute well. And so that experience working in those races really helped me hone my entrepreneurial skills. But I would say too, Dan, you don’t have to work on a political campaign to learn those skills.

Mac

In our work at the regional job board I run, Max List. I talked to a lot of job seekers and the people who I meet who are successful in their careers. They take charge of their careers and they think thoughtfully about what it is they want and what it’s going to take to move ahead. And years in the workplace, they get good at job search skills and career management so they don’t wait to be picked like someone running their own business. They have a vision about where they want to go, what they offer, and they execute on that.

Dan

I love that. So it’s a good maybe charge folks listening to take that responsibility seriously, that it’s not just waiting around for something to happen, but to go out and make it happen. I want to dig more into your expertise around job seekers in a minute. Before we get there, I want to just circle back again to writing election campaigns, human rights in Latin America, you said that the constant being making a difference. I can see how you can make a difference in all of those ways. But I guess what I’m curious about is the choice to choose those options. I think that often people have something they want to do, but they don’t know how to go about doing it. It’s like they’re kind of paralyzed by choice, by too many choices. And I’m curious for you if the choice that you made. I know this is a long time ago now, but still even just to focus on campaigns and getting into the political life, I guess, in that way. And what were some of the motivations? Why was that the vehicle of choice for making change, making a difference?

Mac

Couple of reasons. One, I grew up in Iowa in the 1960s and Seventies, and just as the Iowa caucuses were taking off in 1972, so I could skip classes in high school and go to presidential events and walk into a room with 15 or 20 people and actually meet a candidate running for President. And then later in my twenties, I moved to Massachusetts for a job after a stint in Washington, DC, and worked in government and politics there. So I spent the first third of my life, Dan, in two States that export political organizers. And I think being in those worlds and being part of those environments made a big difference. I also think the values I learned from my parents and my family played a huge part, too. My mother was a school teacher. She was involved in the local bargaining unit of her Union. She eventually led as statewide professional association of special Ed teachers. That was her profession, and that involved going to the state capital and doing lobbying. So seeing people work in politics and that commitment to service and thinking you could make a difference was part of how I was raised, and I think that makes a big difference as well.

Dan

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I’m curious, as your I guess maybe just another comment on that. It’s just always interesting to me what we’re exposed to the opportunities that are around us, just like how in some ways grew up with being around these kinds of conversations, with access to these kinds of conversations, how that really opened doors for you and expanded your imagination in different ways. For me, I’ve never had any exposure to that world, I guess, other than voting and being on the other side of the political campaigns. But I think one maybe take away here that I think is really interesting for people is to think about, like, what are the ways that you’re opening doors for yourself, what are the ways that you’re exposing yourself to different ways of thought and different people doing different work, because it can really change the way you think about possibilities for yourself and what’s next for you when we’re in these kind of transitional moments. And so I just want to make that point. It’s a really nice contrast, I guess, between your younger days and mine. So I’m curious, as you look back on your career and the trajectory that you took, how often did you or were there moments when you felt stuck or uncertain of what comes next?

Dan

I think it’s really easy for us to look in the review mirror and tell a very linear story or smooth over all the transitions and bumps along the way. But often people listening are in those difficult kind of in between times. And I’m curious for you whether you’ve been through those and what those look like for you.

Mac

Absolutely, Dan. I had three great jobs right after College graduation. The first was working on a US Senate race in Iowa where I grew up. And it was a wonderful experience. Even though we lost the race, I learned so much. And fortunately, I had another position lined up after the campaign ended with a human rights organization in Washington, DC, where I had worked as an intern when I was in College. And we worked with national and international media on media relations for human rights issues in Latin America. And that was a great experience. And then the job that followed was with another human rights group in Boston. We took members of Congress on fact finding trips to Central America. This was in the 1980s, so I thought looking for work was easy, and I thought the next job would come just as easily. It didn’t happen. I went through a long period of unemployment, more than six months, and I actually cashed the last unemployment check. And it took me several more months to find a position. So I know that careers have peaks and valleys, and that was a tough Valley. I got out of it because I turned to advice for advice, rather to a colleague of my wife.

Mac

My wife, Chris, was working at Northeastern University in Boston. She knew someone in the career services office person graciously agreed to meet with me, and she took me through the basics of goal setting and some job search skills that I’d never really learned. And it made a big difference. And it helped me get clear about what I wanted and gave me tools that I could use to explore that goal. And within about six weeks, I had a wonderful job as a spokesman for the Boston’s Big Dig, the biggest public works project in the country, in a position that was never advertised. So you’d think I would have learned my lesson, Dan, but I actually went through another long period of unemployment in my 30s, so I’ve had a great career, but I have had my share of ups and downs, and that’s a big part what drives us at Max List, our regional job board. We teach people job search skills and career planning skills so that they don’t make the same mistakes I made.

Dan

Yes. Well, first, thank you for sharing that. It’s vulnerable to talk about those harder moments, but also something I think is really important for us, for people who are in those spaces where they maybe are between jobs and maybe have been for a long time, and how discouraging, disheartening, depressing even that space can be. To hear someone like yourself really successful and have multiple businesses that you’ve been in those spaces, I think is really inspirational and really encouraging. It’s really neat to hear how learning those job skills open those doors for you to find that job in Boston, the big project, do you feel like your time in those spaces, in those in between spaces, and that searching phase, I guess, gives you the energy and the motivation or gave it to you to start MacsList, what was the kind of the impetus for starting MacsList? Maybe that’s the better question.

Mac

Well, my career until I started my two businesses was in communications and working for nonprofits, elected officials and government. And way back in 2001, I was finishing up a seven year stint of working in state government in Oregon. I’d been a speechwriter to a governor and a spokesperson for several different state agencies. My home is in Portland, but I was commuting during those years to the state capital, Salem, about an hour south. And when I took a position with a nonprofit in Portland in 2001, I wanted to stay in touch with my colleagues in state government, and I started sharing job postings informally with them. That was a way not only to be in touch, but to be of service. And my periods of unemployment had taught me the importance of having and growing a professional network and not only asking that network for help, but being of service to that network. So for years, actually nine years, Dan, I just had this informal list that I would share the postings with, and it became overtime a part time job, and I wasn’t charging anyone to receive the material or share it, but I eventually had to turn it into a sort of a side business, which I did twelve years ago.

Mac

And we launched a very modest website, and it’s taken off in the decade that’s followed. So it’s a business now that employs five people, and we get 75,000 visitors who come to our site every month. And we’ve incredible posted positions for several thousand employers in Oregon and Washington. I know I wouldn’t have gone down that road if I hadn’t had those experiences of losing work and if I hadn’t learned how important it was to pay attention to your career and work on job search skills throughout your time in the workplace.

Dan

That’s an incredible story. And who would have known that just something that you were just doing just to give value to people in your network could turn into what it is today? How fun. It’s just really fun origin story, so thank you for sharing that. I’m curious. You mentioned just the importance of having and growing a professional network, and maybe this is a good transition point to some of your expertise in career and taking charge of inviting people to take charge of their careers earlier. Use the phrase career management, which I just love that phrase. But just to start with having and growing a professional network, someone’s wanting to be more intentional with their network, do you have any thoughts of where to begin, how to go about doing that? Because I think that often when we hear someone suggest something like that, we think of like a used car salesman at a networking event just trying to promote their thing, which is clearly not at all what you did with the list that grew into Max list. But I’m curious if you have other thoughts of where someone should or could think about beginning.

Mac

Well, recognize that you have a network. I meet so many people who say when it comes time to do a job search, I don’t know anybody. I don’t know anyone that I could call. And in fact, we all have networks. We have families, friends. We’re involved in different organizations, maybe churches, sports teams, faith communities. And that’s where you want to start because the people who know you want to help you. And I think it’s also if you think about most people do some kind of volunteer work or help out neighbors, or maybe it’s not a formal position, but that’s also a network. So think about those links that you already have. I think the other thing to remember is when you’re going to turn to your network for help, it’s so important to know what you want, and you got to have a goal either that you’re certain of or one that you want to explore. Because if you’re going to ask people for help, you got to make it easy for them to say yes. And the more specific you can be about the position that you either want to get or that you’re interested in and you want to learn more about the easier it is for people to help you.

Mac

But think about working as relationships. It’s very natural. It’s not only about asking for help, it’s about being of service to others. And so when you’re volunteering or helping a friend or a family member or a neighbor, that’s networking, too. The person who goes to the function room at the airport Holiday Inn and thinks that success means collecting a lot of business cards. That’s certainly a form of networking, but it’s not effective and it doesn’t work.

Dan

Yeah, well, I love that in so many ways really thinking about it just as organic and authentic relationships I’ve never thought of before for people that are in that space, what you said is you either have a goal or that you’re committed to that you want pursuing or a goal that you’re exploring. And I think that that’s a really interesting, different take on it. So rather than I just want to pick your brain or something like that, I’m trying to get a job in project management or I’m exploring project management for myself. Could you give me some input on what you do in your project management role or whatever it might be? I think that’s a really great alternative. You don’t know what you want. Just choose something to explore and then use that as kind of the guiding light.

Mac

Yes. And I’ve struggled with this, too. We all do. What is it that I want to do next? And if I’m not service, usually I can come up with two or three things that interest me and everyone I talk to can as well. So write it down, say it out loud, and then go out and find people who are doing those things and talk to them and ask them how they got there. How do people thrive in that occupation? And then take all the objections you have in your head and we all carry them around. Even the most successful people on the outside have these doubts and turn them into questions that will allow you to get advice and insights. So if you think that you can’t break into this field because you’re from another sector or you’re too old or you don’t have the right credentials, or you didn’t go get the degree you think might be required. Turn those objections into questions and say, what advice would you have for somebody who’s switching from technology, the tech sector, who wants to work in nonprofits? How have you seen people do that? What obstacles do they have to overcome?

Mac

How did they overcome those obstacles? And even better, find somebody who had to address the objections you have in your head and ask them for their advice, and you will get amazing insights. The other thing that will happen is if you explore one or two or three goals at once with different people, you’ll find out where your energy is and from after a few of those conversations. And that’s a lot more effective than just sending applications out in response to postings that interest you. But odds are you will never hear back, usually because you don’t have the formal qualifications that an employer might require and you’re competing with dozens or hundreds of people. But through networking and kinds of conversations just described, you can not only get insights into how to overcome those obstacles, you build relationships that can lead to referrals. And referrals are so powerful when it comes to hiring decisions. Even the weakest of connections can make a huge, huge difference.

Dan

That is so good. I just want to maybe reiterate those steps. I think that they are really important of just exploring those goals is choose the goals that you want to explore, write down any fears or doubts that you might have about them, and then turn those fears and doubts into questions, which I love that stuff. That’s not something I’ve heard before and have thought about. But it’s just really powerful because it gives you that fodder for that conversation and a real actionable outcome for the conversation, and then find people to speak into that who are in the field doing similar work or have connections to other folks in those fields. I hope that anyone listening who’s in one of these spaces right now take that to heart and put that process into place in their work. Yeah.

Mac

What you just described in is what we call an informational interview. And it’s got three parts. You’re sharing your story and your goals, and you’re introducing yourself. And the second thing you’re doing is asking those targeted questions that the person you’re meeting with is qualified to answer. And the third thing that you do in an informational interview is you ask for introductions to other people who can provide advice and insights. You can do that have that kind of conversation in 2030 minutes Max. And it’s not about picking somebody’s brain. It’s not about getting together for coffee. It’s a business meeting. You’re in charge, you set the agenda. And at the end of that conversation, if you’ve accomplished those three things. You’ve shared your story, your goals, you’ve asked those targeted questions, and you’ve gotten suggestions about two or three other people that you can talk to. That is a successful meeting. And it’s going to help you not only get referrals to positions that might never be advertised, it will help you uncover jobs that haven’t been posted. But I think most importantly, it helps you figure out if that’s what you want to do and that’s the position you want.

Mac

And if it is, you’re going to be a much better candidate when it comes time to actually interview for the job.

Dan

I love that. Yeah, I imagine you’ll be so much more prepared to use the right language, talk about it in the way that people talk about the work that they’re doing. As insiders, if you’re not necessarily in that role, like to pick up on some of those queues is really important. I love that you’re asking for intros piece and how I just pictured like a Spider web spreading like your network. You don’t even know what’s out there. And we often at least maybe I should speak for myself. My bias is to think of a job search. I want it to be a linear process, like I need a job, I see a post, I apply, I get it. But really often today, it’s so much more that search comes from introductions, through referrals, through just getting into your network and seeing where that takes you by having these kinds of conversations and those intros. An intro from an intro, from an intro from an intro might lead to a job that you would otherwise have no way to surface, no way to even know that it was out there. So I think that’s a really great invitation.

Mac

That’s a great description. And what you’ve described is the way it’s always worked. What’s different today is you can go to job boards like mine, and I’m very proud of the value we offer to our listings and educational resources. And you can find thousands of jobs on my site. You can go to these big national ports. You can find tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of jobs, millions even. But the importance of referrals and networking still matters. So I think people get distracted by the sites. You should check them out. You should come to my board and look at the postings we offer. But I’ll be the first to tell you, Dan, if you’re farther along in your career and you’re spending more than 20% to 30% of your job search time looking at boards like mine, you’re making your search harder and longer than it has to be. So you need to know how hiring works, how the system works, and when you do that, when you understand the system, then you can make the system work for you. That’s why referrals are so important, but also clarity about your goals and knowing the companies or organizations where you want to work, that’s equally vitally important.

Mac

I will say when I talk to people, job seekers, about what they want to do, sometimes I hear, well, I’m not sure I’m keeping my options open, but if I really press them, there’s usually two or three employers that they’d love to work for. And a name will come up and I’ll say, well, who do you know there? I don’t know anybody. Well, that’s okay. Let’s talk about how you start to build relationships with people inside that organization, because when you start having those conversations, you may discover you don’t want to work there. But yes, if you do want to work there, then you’re building a network. You’re building connections that are going to help you. When either find a position that never gets posted or if the position is publicly posted and there are 100 resumes on somebody’s desk, you’ve got somebody you can contact to find out the insights into that position and who might also go down the hall and say, have you talked to Dan? I know he’s applied for the job. I met him. I had coffee. We had a networking meeting. He’s great. You should give him an interview that won’t get you the job, but it’ll get your resume out of that pile of 100.

Dan

Yeah. Give you the foot in the door, give you the extra opportunity that might be all that you need to land something that you otherwise wouldn’t have that opportunity. So good. I want to kind of already talking about this, but circle back to that phrase career management, and ask you, how do you think about career management, or how would you define that for listeners?

Mac

I think it starts with recognizing at the start of your career you’re going to change careers several times. There are estimates out there five to seven times during the course of 40 years in the workplace. And if you’re further along in your career, you’ve probably already gone through that change and understand that from the start and recognize that you’re going to have to learn the skills that are going to help you be successful in transitioning careers. And I think the people who are good at it, Dan, invest time in goal setting. They know what they want to do. They don’t have to come up with a 40 year plan. But they have several areas of interest, and they explore that and they decide, okay, for the next five to seven years, I’m going to focus on this. And there are different ways you can get clarity about your goals. You can work with a career coach. Sometimes you can go back to your career services office at your University. They’ll provide services to grads. Every state has employment offices with coaches. You can do work on your own using online resources or books. Or you can have conversations with colleagues and friends and family.

Mac

However you do it, you’ve got to have that clarity and you have to build that into your search. The last thing you want to do is just start looking online and seeing what looks interesting, have a goal. And then again, I know we touched on this. It’s a big, important part of career management, though, is knowing where you want to go, what organizations offer the opportunities that interest you. And it should be a relatively short list, a few dozen employers, because there are tens of thousands of employers in every state. So you can’t be any all things to all employers. You got to focus on where you want to go. And I think people who are good at that, who are good at setting goals, know where they want to go and finally are good at knowing what they offer and what gives them satisfaction. Those are the people I see who are successful at managing careers and ultimately have the most rewarding careers.

Dan

Yeah, that’s fantastic. And I think that the process is an ongoing and iterative process that you need to be. The best time to think about your goals is you still have a job before you’re forced to think about it. So then you can really think about is my current role taking me where I need to go, and then if it’s not, it gives you a better position to start looking for the next thing because you have some time, you have more time rather than if you’re unemployed and have obligations, and then you have to start asking these questions of where do I want to go and how do I want to get there? And all those things. I encourage listeners, if you haven’t done that work, really thinking critically about these things, now is a great time, and I can help you with that, of course, with my material and MacsList, as well as a great resource for all of that. I want to just zoom out for a minute, Mac, with you just to ask, how do you think about your career, both your past, present and future? How do you think about words like vocation or calling purpose, whatever those words are in your vernacular?

Dan

How do you think about those?

Mac

Personally, I think purpose is an especially important word for me. I have looked for work and have largely been successful in doing so. That makes a difference. And for me, as we talked about at the start of the interview, Dan, I focused on issues in the community where I live and work, but I don’t think purpose can mean a lot of different things to different people. I think people get satisfaction from a lot of different kinds of occupations. And so being clear about that in your own mind, what matters most to you, I think, makes a huge difference in someone’s career.

Dan

I think that’s a great response. It’s very personal. What’s meaningful and purposeful for one person is not necessarily the same for others. I think to move towards wrapping up here. It’s something I would like to ask you to speak to just for people who are listening, who might be in one of these transitional phases, might be feeling stuck when it comes to purpose and knowing what’s next for them. If you have any specific words of encouragement that you would like to offer for folks who are in those kind of tough places.

Mac

In my second period of unemployment, I’d actually moved. I was in my early thirties and I’d had some very cool jobs. I talked about several at the start of our conversation. And then when I came to Oregon, I was working at City Hall managing communications for a mayoral candidate. We lost the election. I was out of work, and I remember meeting somebody. He was the manager of public affairs for intel for the Pacific Northwest. It was a big job and in my world, politics and communications, somebody who I respected. And we had a coffee and I wasn’t in a good state of mind. He was very kind. After we talked for ten or 15 minutes, he said, you know, I’m looking at your resume and I’m not really seeing you. I can tell you’re in a tough place and it’s important to remember that we think our careers are going to be 45 degree angles. And I was not expecting this period of unemployment. I had a graduate degree from Harvard where I studied public administration and communications and had all these cool jobs. But he said careers aren’t 45 degree angles, they’re peaks and valleys.

Mac

And he said, you, my friend, are in a Valley right now, but you’ve had some peaks. And I know that you’re going to hit some peaks again and you’re going to have a great career. And it was very moving to me because this is somebody who I did not know well, I only knew professionally, but he was right. So the important thing is to recognize that we’re all going to have our ups and downs. Going back to your conversation about career management, I think a mistake I made and I see too many people make is I thought about career management is something that I did when it was time to look for another job. And I changed that in my 30s because I realized it was a lifelong habit that I needed to practice. And that meant always not obsessively but regularly checking in on my goals, making sure that the work I was doing professionally and my volunteer work and professional work outside my office supported my goals and that if I was being clear about other areas that I wanted to explore and finding ways to explore them so that when it came time to shift careers, it was a thoughtful, deliberate process that was informed by volunteer work and informational interviews.

Mac

And it wasn’t something that was done out of desperation or fear. And I think so many folks again, I did this as well. We wait to be picked and we send out applications, and we hope that somebody will pull our resume out of the pile. If you’re going to be as successful as possible in managing your career, you’ve always got to be clear about what it is you want, what you offer and where you want to go. And when you do that, you’re taking charge and you’re taking the initiative and you’re going to have a lot more satisfaction. There will be valleys along the way, but they’ll be smaller and fewer, and I think you’ll have more peaks.

Dan

I love that. That’s such a fantastic and inspirational message, maybe even to wrap up with just that. If you’re listening today and are in one of those valleys, just to know that the valleys are temporary, they are hard. There’s no way around that. But that there are good things, other peaks that will come if you persevere and keep moving through it. And to everyone listening, the best time to take ownership, to take responsibility, to maybe be the CEO of your career, if you will, is now. Not when your hand is forced, but so if you haven’t spent time thinking about where you’re going and what you want, now is the best time to do it. So thank you for that, Mac. And thank you for this conversation. It’s been such a pleasure. I have so many more things I wanted to get to, but I’ll have to wait for next time. Thank you for all that you’re doing with MacsList to help people who are in these spaces find their next thing and equip them to do that well. Just really appreciate everything you’re putting out into the world for people who want to follow along with you and your work.

Dan

Do you have anything you’d like to invite people to?

Mac

I encourage listeners to check out the Maxlist website macslist.org. We have a regional job board with positions in Oregon and Washington. I know you have a national audience Dan, but you’ll find lots of content there about how to look for work and how to hire smarter as well. That’s what distinguishes us from the other many great job boards out there. We not only offer positions, but we give our readers the tools they need to take charge of their careers. And if they’re an employer, take charge of their hiring process. I host a weekly podcast. It’s called Find Your Dream Job. Every week I talk to a different career expert about the nuts and bolts of job search. Been doing it for six years now, and you can find it wherever you download your podcast. And I also invite listeners to connect with me on LinkedIn. I post regularly there, and if you do send me a LinkedIn invitation, please be sure to mention you heard me on Dan’s show.

Dan

Love it. Thank you so much, Mac. I’ll make sure to link up in the show notes to MacsList to your LinkedIn and make sure everyone can find those resources again. Thank you so much for being on the show. It’s been really fun having you.

Mac

It’s been a pleasure. Thank you. Dan.

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