Hip hop, Dual Careers, Quitting Your Day Job, and Making Your Own Way with Super Smack

Super Smack is on a rapping, dancing, music-making journey to uplift and inspire anyone who has ever felt underrepresented. He writes thoughtful lyrics that reflect on his experiences and refers to his music as underdog pop.

His career path has spanned everything from cyber security and project management to Broadway and recording and releasing hip hop albums.

Inspired by an eclectic combination of K-Pop, Outkast and Lin-Manuel Miranda, Smack has created a unique sound style that he calls “A-Pop”: Asian, American, Arizonan. After releasing his debut EP “Neon Red” at SXSW in 2019, he went on to co-headline the CRAZY SWITCH ASIANS tour, performing in 16 cities in three weeks.

In 2021 he released his follow up EP “Neon Blue” while also collaborating with fellow Phoenix rapper Mega Ran on the single “Black X Gold”, which was selected for Rolling Stone’s Global Artist Spotlight. 

After living the past 10 years in New York City, Super Smack recently moved back to his original home city of Phoenix, Arizona. With his roots set in a new home, he has begun recording his debut full-length album, which releases later this year. 


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In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What Super Smack does
  • His relationship with music since childhood
  • Being the younger sibling and finding his path
  • The dual-career journey between tech space and music
  • Boundaries and overlap between his two worlds
  • How to integrate different parts of your life on social media?
  • Finding the right vehicle to deliver your complex nature across
  • Super Smack’s calling to contribute to a good cause
  • Music as a more unique way to make a difference
  • Super Smack’s creative process – producing and consuming
  • Closing the first chapter of Super Smack for release
  • His next release and future plans
  • Some advice – you’re either a planet or a spaceship!

Resources Mentioned:

Super Smack’s Bio

Super Smack’s Spotify

Super Smack’s Instagram

Super Smack’s Tiktok

Software Generated Transcription:

Dan

Smack welcome to the Meaning Movement Podcast. It just feels so funny saying Smack. It’s going great. I am so glad to have you here with us.

Super Smack

I chose the name because it makes people giggle.

Dan

It does. Totally does. The question I like to start off with is how do you begin to talk about the work that you do?

Super Smack

Yeah. So my name is Super Smack and I am a dancer, rapper, and pop music artist. I make joyful uplifting music combined with really thoughtful lyrics that kind of reflect on all the different experiences I’ve had. And my main goal is to just inspire and bring joy to people, especially people who have felt underrepresented at any time in their lives. And yeah, I guess you could call it like underdog pop.

Dan

Underdog pop. I love that. That’s a great genre. Tell me about your relationship with music. Has it always been like, have you always been a musician? Has it always been a part of your identity?

Super Smack

Yeah. So music has always been a part of my identity, for sure. So my family is just a big music family. We’re Filipino. My parents were born in Manila, Philippines, and then immigrated here in the late 80s. And then I was born here in the US, me and my sister, who was also a guest on your podcast.

Dan

Yes.

Super Smack

And we were both born here in Phoenix, Arizona, actually, which is where I live now. I just moved back. And growing up, we listened to a ton of music. My parents were big Broadway fans, musical theater. So I actually didn’t listen to my first pop record, like my first pop song, other than maybe something in passing on the radio until I was like ten or eleven or twelve as a kid when we were on long road trips, like driving to see my cousins in California or something like that. The whole road trip would be lame as a Rob compilation CD of Broadway’s greatest hits. So to me, that was music growing up.

Dan

Yeah.

Super Smack

I was also a singer and dancer since I was a little. So it was like my world of music was Broadway music that my parents would play in the car, whatever songs my dance teachers would pick that I would be doing a dance to, it could be like Elvis or Little Richard, probably something like really old timey like that or the music that was in my favorite TV shows. So I was a big Power Rangers fan. So it’s like heavy metal but kid friendly heavy metal. That was my musical world from ages one to ten.

Dan

I love it. I love it. Well, you mentioned your sister will make sure to link up to that interview I did with her. And she took Broadway or dance as her career path and has kind of pursued multiple, I guess, parallel career paths along the way. And I’m curious for you, I don’t know, maybe even just for this podcast is all in the Family, I guess a little bit. People might know some of her story. What was it like for you, like, seeing her pursue that at a professional level? And at what point did you decide to go pro or to not go pro? How did you navigate some of those kind of transition moments in your life?

Super Smack

Yeah, that’s a really good question. So my sister historically has always been the trailblazer. She’s the older one and the younger one. It’s just the two of us. So she always got kind of like first crack, first crack at College, first crack at setting up a career for itself in the real world.

Dan

Yes.

Super Smack

I think we both like to joke that one of the areas where I got first crack was I was the first person to quit my career, which I think both of us have done at least once or twice now at this point. But I got first dibs on that one. So I got to be the Canary and the coal mine for that.

Dan

Yeah, exactly.

Super Smack

When I was in school, I studied international relations in computer science. And what I wanted to be was a super spy. I wanted to be, like, maybe not like the James Bond, but like the dude who’s at the computer in James Bond headset. I wanted to be that dude.

Dan

Yeah.

Super Smack

And I kind of went down that path, not like as a spy, but I worked in civic and federal technology space, and I’ve worked for government contracting, I’ve worked for nonprofits, I’ve worked for private companies in and around the information technology and security space. And my first several years out of College, that’s the career path that I was going down. And all of this singing and dancing and stuff that I’ve been doing as a hobby growing up, I just got to put aside. And in around 2015, 2016, I got this bug in my head that I was probably just spending too much time with my sister, who’s performer on broad successful actress on Broadway. And I was just like, hey, I think I could do some of this. And I wanted to test out really just like, put my skills to the test. So 2016, I left Tech. I was a product manager, and I quit. And I decided I wanted to try my hand at musical theater professionally. So I did that for a few years. And then as I was getting more immersed and getting back in touch with kind of like my artistic side, I discovered songwriting.

Super Smack

I hadn’t really been a songwriter in any real sense before this, but being around singing and dancing and music, I discovered that I actually even more than performing and interpreting a script that someone else had written or a song that someone else had written, I loved just writing my own words. And I found that I had so much to say. And so I actually decided to go down this kind of dual career path where I was like, I want to write and produce my own work. To do that, I need money and resources. So I went back to Tech in 2018 and I work full time for a nonprofit and then for a healthcare company and getting back into that career full time. And then in all my spare time, I don’t know where my personal life went, but all my spare time was setting up this moonlighting as a music maker. And very recently, just to kind of like tie the whole timeline together, I decided that I was going to take a break from my previous job to kind of take some space and reevaluate where I was at and what I wanted to do and what kind of would fulfill me personally.

Super Smack

And this was a couple of months ago, and I took that time. And during this kind of gestation period, I realized and decided that I wanted to pursue music full time, just kind of running full into this direction and seeing where it takes me and who knows what could happen next. But I’m very excited. Here we are leaning very heavily into that, and here we are today.

Dan

I love it. It’s so perfect. I always love having guests on the podcast that are in it all the way. These transitionary moments. And that’s often why people hit play on this podcast is they’re thinking about a transition. They’re thinking about these ideas of meaning and purpose and what are they making with their lives and with their work. And so it’s just so fun to see your trajectory and to see you really go after it here and see where it comes. Hopefully this podcast will age well. But if not, that’s okay too, because it’s all part of the process, right?

Super Smack

I think it will. It’s funny. I think we were chatting a couple of months ago. I was also getting ready to move. I just moved from New York back to Phoenix, and I was like, can we chat in a couple of months? Actually, I think I’m pretty busy right now. And also I think I’ll be able to give you a better story about that because I’m still figuring things out.

Dan

Totally. It’s funny. I get that a lot from potential guests. Like, yeah, I don’t know.

Super Smack

I don’t really have it all figured out yet.

Dan

Let’s circle back. But some of the nature of this is like there isn’t one answer and that we’re all always in process. And so we find a thread, you pull that thread and see where it goes or whatever analogy you want to use. Take that path until it takes you to another fork in the road and you’re like, okay, where is this taking me? Which is just wild and great. So good on you to step out and pursue it. I want to know about your feelings about having the dual career thing. I think is always an important piece of a lot of artists journey really, like giving yourself your stable income to support your art and give you that space to really create your art, which you’ve just transitioned out of that space. But then there can also be feelings of shame or embarrassment one way or the other. Like you don’t want those two worlds to overlap at all. I’m curious just to hear you talk a little bit about what that season was like for you to have these two different parallel paths. How much did they overlap? How much did you talk about one to your coworkers and associates in the other world.

Super Smack

Right.

Dan

Yeah.

Super Smack

The dual career I’ve done times in my life where I was all one career, all the other careers. Dual career a mix. And the dual career one can be really fulfilling and really fun. It’s also really challenging. And I think everybody will have their own will discover their own secret sauce formula. Right. And that also changed over time. It’s changed for me, and it made sense for me because of what I described earlier, of wanting to have space and resources to self produce my own work. What that came with was just a lot of exhaustion, mental exhaustion, like having to switch my brain between these two very different worlds. Right.

Dan

Yeah.

Super Smack

Having to code switch the way that I talk in these different environments, it can be very exhausting because people just use different terminology. People communicate in different ways.

Dan

Even as you started talking about your tech experience, the tone of your voice way down from high energy and happy to very straight laced. And it was really interesting, something I noticed. And so it’s interesting that you mentioned that, like, I could see when you’re especially in government tech stuff, like very serious stuff, very dry.

Super Smack

Very.

Dan

Yes. But that’s not necessarily who you are. Maybe more natural habitat.

Super Smack

Yeah. I I think consider both of them to be my natural habitat. It’s just a different time, I guess. But the thing about the dual career path is I think some people find a way to merge their world together and have them kind of build on top of each other. And I’ve been able to do that with some pieces and some worlds and some skills really translate well, like project management. If you’re an independent artist, you’re also an entrepreneur. You’re not just singing and recording and writing music, but you’re also handling your own promotion, your own project management, hiring freelancers, hiring people to bring onto your team. I’m sure this is something that you could probably understand or relate to.

Dan

Yes, absolutely.

Super Smack

So just being able to kind of manage complexity and see the bigger picture is like a skill that translates. Aside from that, I tended to keep my world pretty. I’m a big superhero fan, so I was very much the Clark Kent Superman. I just have a wall between these things. To protect each space sacred. And yeah, I mean, there were definitely people who knew about my work in both. It’s funny. Now, I recently just started sharing a lot more about not just the output of my music. Like, here’s my new song, but just, like, the process of how I create these things. I’ve started keeping basically like a public daily diary of, like, this is what my life is like. And I share it on my Instagram story. And I’ve had a lot of people I just started doing this in the new year. And a lot of people who I haven’t heard from in years who just stayed connected or they followed me or whatever have reached out to me. And I was just talking to an engineer who is my former coworker. Like, many, many years ago, we hadn’t talked forever and we just ended up in this long chat thread about kind of like pursuing passion and finding the balance between hobbies and work.

Super Smack

And how do you know when you want to turn a hobby into a profession or leave it as a hobby? And it’s cool. I’m realizing that there are so many people in kind of my former circle, my previous day jobs who are really curious and really fascinated about this. What it’s like to do something that’s maybe a little bit more unorthodox and talking to someone who’s kind of lived in both worlds? They seem to be very curious about that.

Dan

Yeah, I love it. I love it. I’m curious about like, this is a selfish question because it’s something that I have a lot of irons on the fire. I do a lot of things. In addition to the podcast, I have a software company that I run these worlds. I’m actively, always working to bring integration and bring these things together. But especially, like on social media and how you show up on social media, I usually just default to like, it’s too complicated. I don’t feel like addressing it. But I’m curious for you. How do you come out as out of the metaphorical phone booth, your Superman Super smack suit to these engineers or something like that? And if you have feelings about letting them see that side of you, or is it just more like, yeah, I’m comfortable in both places and now I’m not doing the engineering stuff as much anymore. And so this is who I am now. I think I want to hear how you navigate the feelings around that, if you’re awesome. Or maybe it’s just me that I have lots of feelings.

Super Smack

No, I think about this all the time. It’s a really good question. I don’t know if I have the answer to yeah, but I could probably produce unanswered and we’ll be good advice.

Dan

Let’s figure it out together.

Super Smack

Yeah. It’s like a balancing act, right? Because on one hand, the combination of things that you do or that I do or that anyone does because everyone has a combination of things that they like to do or good at. That combination of things makes you who you are, right? That’s what makes you unique. So that should be something that you lead with. But on the flip side of that, something that I’ve kind of struggled with, actually, is understanding. And I’ve been thinking about this a lot recently as I’ve been studying pop music artists. And the more you aim to bring people on board, bring people into your world, grow your audience, grow your fan base, whatever this terminology is for whatever industry you’re in, that is, especially these days, people are so inundated with, like, we have so much stimulating us, media and content and everything, like a complicated narrative can be really interesting for someone to dive deep into, but it’s not always a good entry point. And if you present yourself in a way that’s like, if you’re like, hey, what do you do? And I’m like, well, I don’t even know how to answer that question because I do so many things.

Super Smack

It’s like someone’s attention is going to be gone already. By the time you finally figure out your answer to that question, you have to figure out a way to dry terminal. You could call it branding, you could call it your personal narrative, whatever. You find a way to get to the point quickly and get something accessible to people. And sometimes that means simplifying. And I think that’s something that I have really struggled with because I’m like, I do so many things I want to tell you about all of them.

Dan

Yes, 100%, yeah.

Super Smack

And sometimes also it’s unfortunate, but I think it’s also the human nature thing, where for whatever reason, whether it’s logical or not, a lot of people are trained sometimes to think that if someone is doing two things, maybe they’re doing them good, but they’re not doing one of them great. Because if you’re doing one thing great, you would be doing all of that right. And there’s also an art in particular. There’s this persona ideal of this genius artist who’s almost like terrible at everything else because they’re so good at art, which I think is kind of like a load of BS. But that perception is out there. And so sometimes it can actually hurt. I’m not saying I like it, but I have found that sometimes it can hurt. Actually, if I’m like, hey, listen to my song. It’s a really good song. I think you’ll really like it. And then also I’m a product manager at Tech. Sometimes it works, but for a lot of people, they’re like, I don’t know. So this weird balancing thing, I think that there is a way to have the best of both worlds. And I’ve been looking back on my body of work and being like, when did I feel like I was doing this well.

Super Smack

Sometimes I felt like I was doing this better than others. And one time, I felt like I was doing it really well was the first music video that I came out with was to a song called Cheese. And I wrote this song, actually, about all the different hats that I wear. And one verse was about hats, and one verse was about Broadway. And one verse was about rapping. And my sister actually directed this video. And in the video, we went all out and just, like, singing, dancing, animation, costumes, acting, the whole shebang. And we just really leaned into it. And that really I’m really proud of that work for multiple above it because I think it stands. I’m very much a stickler about the quality of my work. And there’s some things that I’m like. I wasn’t really happy about that. I’m like, suit that on the rug. This is like, I’m so proud of. And I think the key there was it was a multimedia piece of artwork. There was the music, there was the visuals, there was dancing, there was animation on top of it. And figuring out how to find a medium can deliver a complicated message, but in a very accessible way.

Super Smack

I’ve been playing around with that thought recently. It’s like, okay, how can I find the right vehicle to deliver this complicated message?

Dan

Yeah, I love that. That is such a good way to approach it. And I’ve watched that music video. That was my first introduction to your work.

Super Smack

Oh, nice.

Dan

I think your sister mentioned it, and I think we even linked to it from the episode we did with her. We’ll make sure to put that show notes as well.

Super Smack

Yeah, that was her directorial debut.

Dan

And she added, it was so fun. It was such a fun. Such a fun video, such a fun song. It’s all wonderful. I’m curious, like, on that idea of the complex nature of humans. Right. But of work, what you said about the complexity is what makes you who you are. I’m curious for you just to speak even more directly about your work product, your body of work, and how do you think about meaning whatever words use the words that are in your vernacular, meaning calling legacy, purpose? I’m not sure, but I’m curious how you think about that when it comes to the work you’re doing now and the work that you’ve done in the past.

Super Smack

Yeah. So ever since I was a kid, I’ve always wanted to help save the world. It’s like super cheesy. But as a kid, I was all in on comic books, superheroes, video games, fantasy, Sci-Fi. I lived in these worlds where it was just like, that was where my headspace was at the good people save the world. And so I was like.

Dan

When I grow up.

Super Smack

I want to be one of these good people helping to save the world. So that’s where my various kind of career interests over time have developed. It’s very much just like, what can I do to contribute to some cause or some goal that I think is good not just for me, but for other people. When I first transitioned into musical theater, I had this kind of, like, guilt in the back of my head because I was like, I’m leaving this job where the through line is very obvious. I’m like helping secure data to make the world safer or operate more efficiently. Right. And it’s, like, very much this thing that okay. That’s, like, for a good cause.

Super Smack

I’m like, Now I want to sing and dance because I want to

Dan

Sing and dance the bad guys away.

Super Smack

I don’t know. I kind of just said that in the back of my mind for a while. And then as I discovered songwriting and how much I loved that, what really, I think gave me the ability to reconcile this, like, save the world kind of, like, thing that’s just baked into my DNA. I couldn’t change that if I tried with the art was when I started to. Well, first it was like a bit of a selfish thing where I was like, I just have things that I need to say that I’ve never really said to myself, and I feel like sharing them with other people. And so I think initially, maybe that was, like, a goal that kind of originated within the self. And as I started doing that, I started getting seeing the impact that a live performance or music or video could have on people in my audience and kind of the messages that I would get afterwards. I remember the first time I did a live show. It was in Portland, Maine, when I was on tour, and that was the first time that I did a show where there were people in the audience.

Super Smack

So I’d never met before who knew all the words to my songs, and they were, like, singing and sing along. Talk to me afterwards. And there was this mixed Filipino guy who was like, I’m the only Filipino in Portland maine, and he was like, I love your music.

Dan

I love it.

Super Smack

And we, like, chatting. It’s just, like, all these types of stories. I think that going back to what I mentioned at the beginning, when you were like, how do you describe what it is that you do? And I think it’s important to describe what I’m doing and also why I’m doing it. And telling a story from a place where I have felt underrepresented for many times in my life and telling that story and helping to energize and kind of make this underdog pop music and connect with people through that. That’s been the thing where it’s like, oh, this is making a positive difference. And not only that, but this is actually a more unique way to make a difference where I was good at the tech product management stuff, and I probably could have kept doing that, but also there were other people who could have done what I was doing. And I think thinking about that frame of mind where it’s like, what’s the singular thing that you can contribute? Once I started thinking about that, it became a little bit more clear that I was like, I need to keep nurturing this music project and seeing how much of an impact I can make.

Dan

I love it. Yeah. It makes so much sense, too, that you’re so much closer to your impact. Right. You’re on the stage and the people are right there, or you get emails you hear, at least at its best in those moments. Those are the really rich moments. Right. When you’re hearing from people how you’re impacting them. Well, when you’re doing tech for government agencies, you’re never going to know. I mean, maybe, you’ll know, yeah, we stopped this hacker attacker, whatever it might be, but it’s just such a different recipe, I guess you’re so much further from the difference that you’re making. And so it also makes sense to me from that standpoint.

Super Smack

Yeah.

Dan

It’s really great. Yes. I’m curious, how do you think about the creative process? I’m always like hearing artists and creatives musicians. Where do you start when it comes to creating new work?

Super Smack

Yeah. For me, it always starts with, like, what’s your inspiration? Right. That’s a hard question. Where do you buy the inspiration? And I go through modes where I am producing a lot, and then I go through modes where I’m consuming a lot, and I try to not mix those two modes together because if I need the inspiration, that’s when I will consume music, movies, TV, right. There’ll be, like, these months where I’m just, like, gobbling up all this stuff and just, like, letting all the reactions in my head all kind of mixed together and then hoping that a spark of inspiration will flow from that or just, like, going out and talking to people. Because a lot of inspiration for my songs actually just comes from conversations that I have with friends or maybe sometimes even people I don’t know that. Well, just these human to human interactions where later I’ll be reflecting on it and I’ll be like, oh, I feel like there’s a story to tell here. There’s a song to tell here.

Yeah.

Super Smack

I Journal a lot. I Journal like a maniac. I write. I fill up pages constantly. Like, every hour I’m throwing stuff in the Journal. So that’s, like, a useful way to just try and buy in the universe for something that will inspire you. And then from there, it’s actually a pretty, like, I’m, like, pretty methodical when it comes to, like, the creating. When I’m in create mode, it’s like, okay, let’s find if it’s a song. I usually try and start with the beats or at least a melody. If melody in my head, throw it into a voice memo. I have a network of collaborators now. I’m like, hey, I have this song idea. Can we turn this into a beat. I found good communities to discover instrumental tracks or network with producers. And then when I started writing, I really like to at the beginning stages of writing a song with just me and figuring out, OK, what’s like the top line, like the melody, the lyrics, the hook, some of the verses, some ideas that are going to the verses. I really like to be in motion, I think, because maybe because I was a dancer, I just find that when I’m sitting still, it’s hard to write words, creative words for a song.

Super Smack

So walking or driving, I drove from New York to Arizona last month and I wrote four songs while driving. I’m just like using the voice memos on my phone. So yeah, there’s many, many stages, of course, to creating a song and then even more when you’re like, okay, let’s create a music video and all that stuff. But yeah, I try and be very deliberate about all right, I’m going to shift from consumemode to produce mode from consumers and try not to blend this too much together, because when I’m creating, I actually don’t want to be consuming too much because I don’t want to end up maybe subconsciously copying something that someone else has done and I want to stay focused anyway.

Dan

Yes, I love that it’s a great way to answer that question. But shifting metaphor, I think is really helpful. It also takes a different mindset to be just taking it in versus output, which is great. What are you creating right now? Maybe you could answer this today. You can answer this maybe. What’s your next big release? Or I don’t know, but what are you in right now? What’s going on?

Super Smack

Yeah. So right now I would describe it as I’m in the closing phases or the closing pages of the first chapter of Super Smack. So the first chapter of Super Smack was talking about kind of like my origins and my roots. And I took a lot of inspiration from video games, actually. You might have seen like a picture of me wearing this red and blue switch jacket. And the reason I did that was I was inspired when I was in this consume phase by all of these rappers and MCs and pop artists who I really admired and kind of reflected on the fact that a lot of their work, especially early work, is reflecting on their roots. So I was like, what’s my version of this? What’s my kind of reflecting on my own roots? And so I had two EPS. One called Me on Red, the other one Called Me on Blue. And now I’m going to release a double EP with some additional tracks that kind of like tie these things together. The Red side is like very upbeat, energetic, Sunshine driving to the beach kind of music. And then the Blue side is like nighttime drive, stroll a sunrise jog, a deep study session, or writing session.

Super Smack

Kind of like bringing these two things together.

Dan

Cool.

Super Smack

So that’s kind of like my first chapter. The next chapter is I have a lot of it figured out, and some of it I’m ready to kind of talk about some of it. I’m still kind of like playing with not quite ready to talk about yet.

Dan

Totally.

Super Smack

But what I can say is that it’s going to be even more multidisciplinary and multimedia than anything that I’ve done before. So kind of going back to what I thought worked well with that choose music video and just amping it up and just like, amp up the production value, the stakes, the creative input that goes into it, I realized that even within art. Right. We were talking about, like, specializing versus being this hybrid. Even within art, I’ve actually realized that I’ve kind of been specializing a lot, and I want to open that up and broaden that up now, whereas I really was focused on being a recording artist. So, like, the quality of the lyrics and the production and sound and how it all sounds. And I’m happy I did that. But I’m at a point now where I danced before I ever sang. And I haven’t really been dancing a lot because I’ve been so focused on the music making. And now I’m ready to really bring these two together. So I’ve been making a lot of work and content and really formulating down to my live performances. How can I bring these things together and kind of make super smack a really multi level experience?

Super Smack

So, yeah, in short, dance, there’s going to be a lot of dance happening in 2022, I can tell you that.

Dan

Well, I can’t wait to see that coming to fruition, wherever that takes you. It sounds like it’s going to be really engaging and multidimensional, which is just really fantastic for people who are listening. And a lot of people hit play on this podcast because they’re in thinking about how to do more, how to get more meaning, more purpose, how to figure out maybe they’re thinking about a career change. Maybe they’re trying to decide if they want to do a career change and weighing the pros and cons. And a lot of times people just feel really kind of stuck in where they are and uncertain of what to do next. I’m curious if you have any words of advice. People are in that stuck trying to figure it out. Kind of space.

Super Smack

Yeah. Oh, man. Okay. I’ve been thinking about this a lot. I have a metaphor. I’m going to try it out. I haven’t really shared it to anyone else.

Dan

Workshop it. We’ll workshop it live right here.

Super Smack

Live something that’s been helpful for me and talking to other people who kind of walked similar paths. I think you always want to be either a planet or a spaceship. And I’ll describe this a little bit more. I realized for so much of my life, I was this spaceship, kind of, like exploring the Galaxy? And, like, let me try this over here. Let me learn about this. I’m going to fly over here. I’m going to explore. And that can be very fulfilling. I’m at a point now in my life where I just left New York City, like one of the Mecca of entertainment to come to Phoenix, Arizona. People are like, Why? And I’m like, why not? I’m ready to plant myself here in this space and be the planet that people come to now. I’m ready to be more grounded and just kind of try and attract things to come to me rather than exploring so much elsewhere. And so I think it’s good to be able to make that kind of similarly deliberate shift from like, I’m going to go into planet mode or I’m going to go into spaceship mode. As long as you’re doing one of those, I think you’ll probably be good to get your mindset fully committed to one of these things.

Super Smack

What you don’t want to be is like this in between thing where you’re probably, I don’t know what the metaphor is here. Like a piece of space debris, just like floating aimlessly. You don’t want that. Like, then you’re neither. You want to either have the engine or you want to have the gravity.

Dan

Yes. I love that. The engine versus the gravity. Either one is a force. Yeah, I think it’s a great metaphor. It really resonates with me. I think you through different phases of my life. It very much fits. So go with it.

Super Smack

I think it works. I’ll keep it.

Dan

I love it. I love it. It’s been so much fun to connect and just I’m a big fan of everything that you’re up to. Really excited to see where this journey takes you. For folks, I want to connect more with you. Are there any specific action steps you’d like to invite them to?

Super Smack

Okay, so first off, hit me up on I think best and most immediate place to engage with me is on Spotify, Instagram, and YouTube. I just started my TikTok, and I’m very excited about that. So you can find me on all the platforms. If you just search for Super Smack, you’ll find me.

Dan

Love it.

Super Smack

I’ve got new music coming out, actually next week, and then I’m releasing new music every four weeks. So there’ll always be something new and fresh to come into the one that I’m dropping next week. I’m really excited about it’s. Unlike anything I’ve ever done for. I’m very excited. So, yeah, just search for Super Snack on those platforms. And if you want to DM me on anything. I’m usually pretty good about responding to people, and I love talking to people.

Dan

I love it. Great. I’ll make sure to link up to those in the show notes as well so people can just click on through and listen to the tracks you’re releasing. Super excited myself to follow along.

Super Smack

Yeah, I also have a website which has all these things kind of tied together. Which is probably easiest to remember. Supersmackpop.com perfect.

Dan

Love it. Love it. Well, this has been it’s just a blast. Thank you so much for the time and connection. It’s been just really fun. Thanks for being here. Awesome.

Super Smack

Thanks. Dan.

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