Performance, Brain Optimization, and Making Your Own Path with Chris Reynolds

Chris Reynolds is a lifestyle entrepreneur & podcaster who has interviewed over 400 of the world’s top entrepreneurs and high-performers. He currently runs a private community of high-net worth entrepreneurs called M3. While traveling the world, he built a business that helps entrepreneurs optimize their lives and performance through neuroscience, brain scanning and proven productivity methods. 

Everything Chris does revolves around one theme — his mission to help entrepreneurs grow their businesses and personal lives. He is an international speaker and runs live events for entrepreneurs all around the world. He loves to talk about neuroscience, performance optimization — especially for entrepreneurs — and how to work towards optimizing their brain to live more balanced and fulfilled lives.


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In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What Chris does
  • The focus of his work and purpose in life
  • The trajectory of his business and what went into building it
  • The motivation behind his work
  • Understanding a few basic income streams
  • The significance of financial tear-downs
  • What is high-performance?
  • How to manage your time to level-up
  • Navigating the gray areas
  • The importance of ‘thinking time’
  • Choosing between a nine-and-a-half and a ten
  • Sorting your priorities regularly
  • The thread that connects high-performers
  • Chris’s visionary concept of ‘legacy’
  • Insights from brain science — its effects on productivity and growth
  • Imagining the future with the growth of cutting-edge technology
  • It’s selfish to not pursue your dreams – go after them!

Resources Mentioned:

Chris’s website

Software Generated Transcription:

Dan

Chris, welcome to the Meaning Movement Podcast. I’m just so excited to have you here with me. Welcome to Show.

Chris

I’m excited to be here, Dan. Let’s make a great podcast.

Dan

Yeah, let’s do it. The question I like to start with is how do you begin to talk about the work that you do?

Chris

I know you’re going to ask me that. So I kind of thought about it. And you know how we’re supposed to have like a scripted answer for that, especially for entrepreneurs, they say, be direct, be clear, and have a couple of sentences or maybe just a few words you can describe it. For me because the world and, you know, this being in the tech world that we dabble in, there’s still a lot of people that don’t really understand what we do. And it kind of depends on who I’m talking to. So some people my answer might be a podcaster, and that’s it. I leave it at that. And they’re like, oh, cool. And then some people maybe they’re outside of the tech world, and then some people like yourself and probably most of the people listening, then you dive a bit deeper into it. And I’ll do that. Now. The first thing I always say is I’m a podcaster, and I run a podcast for the past seven years that talks about the blending of entrepreneurship and high performance. And we did a series we do 100 episode series. So we did 106 figure entrepreneurs and 107 figure entrepreneurs, then 100 major entrepreneurial influencers.

Chris

And now we’re on to the next series. And then we also do high performance clips within that podcast that are two to ten minutes long, getting all the good high performance nuggets out of an episode so you can listen, like on the go. Then the next thing is, I am co-founder of an entrepreneurial community for people that have more or less bootstrapped online businesses that have hit 500K plus. And in that we do events for entrepreneurs. And so the events are open to members and non members. For example, we have an event coming up. They’re usually kind of like high-intensity business or business-luxury types of events. So last fall we did an event on Cabo is like a luxury trip on the beach. And then next month in February, what we’re doing is an event called the Grand Theft Auto Experience, where we’re going to Las Vegas and we drive Lamborghinis and Ferraris, we drive rally race trucks, we fly in a helicopter and shoot a machine gun out of a helicopter. And we fly in stunt airplanes. And we play laser tag, which is a real thing in Las Vegas. You can play laser tag in stunt airplanes with a stunt pilot driving it, and you shooting your friends out of the sky.

Chris

So that’s as short as I can give an answer. Yeah.

Dan

So fantastic. And I know Adam Anderson is involved with the community as well.

Chris

Right yeah. He’s a co-founder with you.

Dan

Yeah. He’s been on the show as well. So we’ll make sure to link up to that episode as well. Yeah. So you’ve got a few irons in the fire, which I know you’re speaking my language as far as your approach to life, which is great, maybe kind of enter into this is just Dan’s self-help hour here. How do you think about where you put your time when you have so many things going on?

Chris

Yeah. So all those things the reason why I have those things and I focus on them, they’re all in alignment with basically one thing. Right. And they’re all basically connected to one another. So it sounds like it’s a lot, but it’s under the umbrella of one business. Does that make sense? And I know you talk about purpose a lot and meaning in life. And so maybe to jump ahead a little bit, everything I do revolves around the purpose of helping entrepreneurs grow, helping them grow in their businesses significantly, and helping them grow in their personal life. So if you look at the podcast, that’s why we talk about entrepreneurship and high performance. If you look at the entrepreneur community, that’s why we have the events and scheduled Masterminds, and we do some other things within the group. And the events also are about bringing entrepreneurs together to have these really incredible life experiences where they bond and then they can grow their businesses together. I do juggle a lot, and it does sound like a lot, but it’s all laid out in like a funnel or form. That is all one thing if that makes sense.

Dan

I love it. That’s helpful. Well, let’s just rewind a minute here. How did you get into this? I can’t imagine that you woke up as a five-year-old, a young version of yourself saying, I’m going to be a podcaster because it wasn’t the thing there. But what’s been your trajectory? How did you get into what you do now?

Chris

Yeah. So basically I started kind of traveling the world and building a business online way back in, I believe, 2009. And I started building a business online in 2009. Then by 2011, I was traveling the world and continuing to grow that business. One of the things that I found while traveling the world and growing a business is that I had all the freedom that I wanted in life. But I didn’t have, like, the community. I didn’t have my people. I travel and meet other travelers or backpackers or local people, but they weren’t these like minded entrepreneurs that a lot of us really thrive. This is why we come to your podcast, because we can get like minded ideas and learn from you and your guests. Right. And so I was in Barcelona, and this is fast forward to 2014. And I was like, I want to do an event where we spend three months in Barcelona and we all come together and we build business together. We get a bunch of entrepreneurs, build business, and enjoy the city together. And so again back to that purpose. And at the time, it was unconscious of what was happening that I really wanted to bring entrepreneurs together, build business together, and grow as humans.

Chris

And so we did that, and it turned out to be a success. And then I started a business called the Entrepreneur House on the back side of that where we would go to different cities around the world, and we would have those month long experiences. It got to the point where that was taking too much of my time. And I realized to scale that I would have to be in these physical locations more than I wanted. And going back to the mindset of how do we really leverage and manage our time? I decided, okay, I’m going to take my physical self out of this and take all the value out of the Entrepreneur House and put it into online stuff. And so it turned into coaching and courses. And then we would do one annual event, and we turned that event into the name. We turned it from the Entrepreneur House to a ten day event which happened in Thailand once a year called Get Shit Done Live. And so we would go to Thailand. We would go to Thailand, and we ran it for a few years and then covid hit, and we would go and we’d spend ten days and we’d stay at this resort type of complex, and everybody would set goals within those ten days to really move the needle in their business.

Chris

And so it was working out really well. Then covid happened, so we couldn’t travel anymore. And that took a lot of changes for a lot of our businesses. And then we moved it basically all that stuff, basically to online with private community of entrepreneurs. And now that it’s two years post-covid, we can start doing events again, as we did last year, early last year.

Dan

Love it. So great. It sounds like your process is kind of like a continual evolution of see these themes, like, kind of moving throughout, and it’s like, okay, this is working, but we want it to work better or differently. And so then it kind of becomes a new thing, which is really.

Chris

Yeah, I think it’s slight shift, same purpose, slight shift.

Dan

I feel like whether our listeners are entrepreneurs or not, I feel like it’s a common theme that I see in people’s stories where you can’t ever map out your trajectory perfectly. Right. You can’t plan your whole life, but what you can do is know where kind of the direction you want to go and give that direction is helping entrepreneurs grow their businesses and personal lives. But the way that manifests isn’t something that you can necessarily even predict what it will look like ten years from now or whatever might be.

Chris

Yeah.

Dan

Which is really, I think, cool to see in your story. I’m curious about the first business that you were growing as you were traveling. Has that been sunset as you started focusing on helping entrepreneurs?

Chris

Yeah, we started doing niche websites online with Google AdSense, and that was the very first thing, first online thing. And Google wrote a few algorithms and wiped out businesses back in the day is much easier than it is now.

Dan

I love it. Do you feel like your work now, I can see this from the outside, and I can see how this could be true. But I’m curious if it feels this way for you, that this focus on helping entrepreneurs, do you feel like that’s come out of your own desire or the kind of the need that you had to have more community, more support?

Chris

100%? I’m naturally an extrovert and specifically like, an extrovert for entrepreneurial personal growth type of people. And so when I get around those people, my world lights up. And if I’m not around those people, I actually kind of feel depressed and lonely. And so it’s the concept of tribes where when you find your tribe, you feel like you’re at home. And so that’s just unconsciously. Why not always travel in the world? I mean, I was living in Costa Rica. I had a Beach, I had a girlfriend at the time. We had these remote businesses. We could do whatever we wanted. And then I was lonely. I was like, what’s happening? Why am I lonely? I have the ideal four hour work week. Perfect life almost. It wasn’t until, like, a forced unconscious traveling the world while being kind of lonely. Like, I’ve got to bring some more people into my life, and it really helps so many online entrepreneurs out there. Like, they have that feeling. They’re running their businesses. Maybe it’s from their home or they’re traveling or from the city, wherever they’re at in a small town. And they’re just like, when they get around their own people, it really lights them up.

Chris

And I’ve always been really good at bringing those people together and creating experiences that really line them up.

Dan

I love that. And it resonates so much with me, just my own experience. I love my friends, I love my community. They’re fantastic. But they’re also like a different kind of connection. When you’re around people that are, I guess, get the struggle, the wins, the losses, like, just the roller coaster of entrepreneur. Not that everyone’s life isn’t a roller coaster or is exciting in its own way, but it is just a unique journey that not everyone can resonate with.

Chris

Of course, yeah yeah

Dan

Definitely makes a lot of sense for me. So looking from the outside that someone like yourself, and I say someone like yourself, like someone who has an online business, has a podcast doing all these different things. I’m always curious how, like, I don’t know how to ask this question in a tasteful way. So if it comes out, if it comes out sour, okay, that’s fine. We can reframe it. I would love a breakdown of all the income streams underneath your brand. Not that you need to give me the dollars and amounts, but where does all the income flow?

Chris

Yeah. So we have the podcast and we have advertisers on the podcast, we have courses that are still out there for high performance optimization and then the community and then the events. So four basic streams there for the events, what we do is for the members, they get to come at cost, and for the non members, they come and we put a little bit of money on the back side of that to make some money. And then we have a monthly and a yearly fee for our community members. And then over the years, I’ve put some courses out there that bring some money in as well.

Dan

I love it. Thank you for answering that. It’s an awkward question to ask, but I feel like it’s an important thing for people who are on the other side, people who maybe they’re working nine to five or whatever it might be, or maybe they’re starting their own thing and they’re like, how do people do this? How do people make a podcast, make money and have like, here’s some categories you can think through. I think it’s really yeah.

Chris

I think so too. And one of the things I really think it’s important because one of the things we do actually in our community is we do yearly financial tear-downs. And so the people in your group and then with Adam and myself that you form trust around these people and everything’s confidential. You do a financial tear-down of your business and you really get to because we don’t talk about that stuff that often. We try to just keep it inside. Right. So you really get to open up and it feels good to open up. But also people learn from you, and then they can give suggestions like, oh, you’re spending that much on ads and that much on marketing, that’s too much or that’s not enough. You really need to increase that percentage. And you learn a lot from that. And it’s kind of like some entrepreneurial therapy in many ways. We go in and do a financial tear down and everybody feels better afterwards and they realize we’re all in the same boat together just with different businesses.

Dan

Yeah. It’s really scary on the front end. You’re afraid it’s going to hurt real bad.

Chris

Yeah.

Dan

It turns out to not be as scary as it might seem. I feel like when you start looking at the dollars and cents, I think it really reveals. It can reveal a lot. It can reveal someone’s values. It can even show reveal fears or anxieties and place things that they’re otherwise without someone else’s eyes on it, you might not be as prone to address kind of the underlying motivations or whatever might be driving those expenditures or whatever it might be, which makes a lot and I’m sure there’s a ton of optimizations even that come along the way. So that makes a lot of sense. How big is your team?

Chris

Me and basically one person, two people. So I have an agency that handles the back end of the podcast.

Dan

Oh, nice. Yeah, that’s great. I want to kind of tap into some of your knowledge around high performance. And I guess maybe kind of a place to start is how do you define high performance?

Chris

That’s a great question. I don’t know if anybody’s ever asked me that before. So offhand, I would have to say, is living an above average life or doing above average activities to get above average results?

Dan

That’s great.

Chris

It just came from nowhere.

Dan

Yeah. If not, we’ll just have to rewind and go back. Because I felt like that was so well said.

Chris

Yeah. Because I also think you can’t stereotype high performance because what’s high performance for the average individual or somebody that grows up in another country in extreme poverty could be completely different from somebody else in their experience in life. It’s really about getting the information you need to get. So you can just take your life to the next level on a regular basis. And that’s high performance. You don’t have to be a professional athlete, you don’t have to be a multi billionaire. You don’t have to be Elon Musk. You can be the regular nine to Fiverr. You can live in Brazil or Somalia and just trying to just do it the best with your life on a regular basis.

Dan

Yeah, I love that. I’m curious, from your experience working with people around performance, what are some of the common pitfalls or what’s the low hanging fruit of leveling up your performance?

Chris

Well, kind of what we’ve been talking about then is quite often it’s people trying to do too many things with their time. Right. And not understanding how to manage your time. One of my favorite books is Essentialism, and it’s by Greg McKeown, and he was on the podcast a year and a half ago or so. And even him, like the guy that writes a book on Essentialism, talks about how challenging it is for him to cut the fat on a regular basis. And so it’s continually saying no to things. And even the most successful people will have to say no much way more often than saying yes. It’s like 99 to one. Right. And also if you’re really focused on one or two major things, then as soon as an opportunity comes across your plate, it can almost be an immediate no. That’s the hardest thing for so many people because especially in the digital world today, you’re distracted and there are so many new opportunities like you Google, make money online and all these things come up. You Google remote jobs, you Google travel the world, and it’s overwhelming. And so for really most people that really want to live a high performance life, one of the best things that you can do is just weed through the get really good habits and weeding through things on a regular basis.

Chris

You have to weed through things almost daily. Somebody invites you to this dinner or social events, you’re like, no, I can’t do it this time is reserved for my relationship. So just making decisions like that and the faster that you can make those decisions, I think the better off you’re going to be and the better results you’re going to get for whatever those things that are your priorities.

Dan

I love that. I mean, this is like guilty as charged. I’m like, I need more and more of this in my life. One of the things that I struggle with related to this is that I have a lot of things that I’m pretty good at, and I have a lot of things. So I have a very much of a portfolio approach to life and to business. And some of it is by necessity. It’s like one part hedging bets, one part like I’m doing these things while I’m trying to get this other thing off the ground. But then there’s this tipping point that I think is going to happen where it’s like, I’ve got to kill these projects because the potential just doesn’t match the potential these other projects until you’re at that tipping point. It feels like this is kind of describing where I am right now, this kind of painful middle ground where it’s like, okay, I think this needs to go, but also I’m making decent money doing it. And yet I know that there’s so much more potential on the other side focusing on this other thing. I’m not sure what the question is here other than maybe is there a matrix or how do you think about what to say no to?

Dan

I guess wanting to kind of focus in more on those decisions where it’s like just the gray area, I guess, is what I want to hear you talk more about.

Chris

Yeah, it’s a really good question because it’s so easy to adopt. And I also think, like, the challenges quite often are different for the different sexes, males and females. Women can quite often run a couple of businesses and multitask really really well and do a phenomenal job at that, as opposed to men, that it actually kind of quite often will bring more stress into our lives and anxiety because we’re not laser focused. And so it kind of depends on the situation and it depends on what is happening. But one of the most important things is a friend of mine. This is his philosophy / quote / theory, and it’s not exact, but most people don’t consider “thinking” work, and quite often thinking is our most important work and especially allotting time for us to have relaxed, clear thinking time. So maybe that’s taking a walk for half an hour a day, doing a meditation, going to a boot camp, going on vacation where you’re clear of all devices and distractions. And when we get into that state of mind, it lowers our brainwaves and we can then think much more clearer on what are the real priorities. Right. An easy way to do that also is to play the hell yeah game.

Chris

So if anything is not completely a hell yeah. Like exciting you and direct it’s a win-win for your purpose in life and everything that you have going on, then it’s a no. If it’s not a ten, if it’s a nine or below, it’s a no. And quite often, more tens will show up in your life if you’re focused on just committing to those tens. Sometimes we do need to go through like, meditation or some regular thinking time per day to figure out what those tens are, because you may have a nine and a half and a ten on your plate and you’re really torn and that’s easy to do. But then at the end, even if you write those down on a piece of paper, one will start to stand out just a little bit more. Or if you’re thinking in your mind, one will just kind of start just like stick out more often. And another good question that I asked myself a lot is if you knew what to do, what would you do? And most people jumble with that question, but there’s always a quick answer that pops up. But if you’re not over analytical and trying to analyze each scenario, there’s always an answer that pops up that’s a little bit more profound.

Chris

And if you say, if you know what to do, what would you do? And you say this, then it can easily come to you and like, okay, I’m just going to have confidence and go with that. Does that make sense?

Dan

Yes, it makes so much sense. I just love that hypothetical. If you knew what to do, what would you do?

Chris

Yeah, exactly.

Dan

That step to the hypothetical. And I feel like there’s a few different areas of life where it just helps just free up your mind to think in different ways, which is really great. Maybe give listeners even as a really practical step around this. It sounds like a really great exercise would be and you can direct me if I’m directing them wrong. But just to do an audit of what are your obligations, what are your time obligations? What are the things that you have choice over? Let’s maybe put it that way and then give that rating of from a ten, being like, this is maximum hell yeah. Zero. Being like, why am I doing this and rate those things and then just see what kind of bubbles to the surface.

Chris

I love it out.

Dan

Would that be a good way to access this?

Chris

I think, yeah. That’s a fantastic idea. And if you’re really torn, like a good old fashioned pro-con list really helps as well. Like, you’re writing the pros and cons and seeing that on paper, I recommend to people like, review that weekly — for sure monthly — but weekly and I have, like a regular weekly planning process where I’m like, okay, what are my priorities? I’ve got my three priorities for the year. What are the tasks I need to do to hit the targets for the priorities this week and then write those down and put them in my planner.

Dan

When do you do that? The end of the week or the beginning of the week?

Chris

I do it every Monday morning, eight to about 10:00 every Monday morning.

Dan

Awesome. That’s very cool. Related to this concept of high performance, I’m curious just to hear some of your thoughts. Having interviewed so many people that are performing at a high level, at least in one area of their lives, in their business, what are some of the commonalities that have surfaced between all these people? What is it that makes someone and maybe we’re already talking about it. Maybe it’s that they have their thing. That’s their thing. But I’m curious if there’s other things that themes that have emerged.

Chris

I think the main thing is everybody really wants to their version of an above average life and achieve their dreams and live a good life, have fulfillment, have enjoyment, have great people in their life. And that’s the root of really all of it. It doesn’t matter the business that you’re building or what route you take in life or where you come from, that sort of thing. But everybody wants to find their own happiness. Right. And anybody that goes after whatever they define success, like even if it’s a nine to fiver or somebody that comes from the most remote place in the world, they’re just looking for that vision that they have of their life to be fulfilled in some way.

Dan

I love that. That’s really. Yeah. It makes a lot of sense. Yeah. I think I’m always interested in hearing how people like yourself think about words like calling words, like meaning, purpose, legacy, whichever one of those words you use. How do you think about that in your own work?

Chris

I think about them quite often, all the time when I get really clear, all of those overlap into, let’s just say priorities. Priorities have meaning purpose. Priorities come from purpose. And quite often it takes an individual some time to really figure out what their purpose is. I had no idea when I was first started traveling the world that my purpose would be like bringing people together, bringing specifically entrepreneurs together, and then just going through the process of understanding that purpose. And then how are you going to make that purpose or how are you what’s the work that you’re going to do to fulfill that purpose, right. One thing I think we probably don’t pay enough attention to somebody who needs to make a course or write a book about this is like just specifically legacy, which is a fantastic word. And as I get older, I start to think more and more of what my legacy is going to be. And I’ve done an exercise where not only did I do like a ten year and a 50 year vision plan, but also 100 year and then a 500 year vision plan. So what is the world like 500 years from now because you were in it?

Chris

And that is a tough question to ask. But also when you start to write it down, it brings a lot of clarity, and you can then reverse engineer to what you want to do, what’s the impact you want to make for 100 years and then 50 years and 25 and ten and one and what you’re working on today?

Dan

Incredible.

Chris

Yeah, it’s incredible. But I really think somebody I don’t know if there’s a book out there around legacy, but I think it’s probably time somebody writes one that just diverges more into the concept of legacy specifically. And what is the legacy that each individual is leaving with their lives?

Dan

Yeah, I love that. I think that so much changes when you think in longer terms, even from simple things like what you buy, what you’re spending your resources on to what you’re creating, what you’re working towards, all of these things. I’m curious if you have any specifics that you’d be open to sharing. How has that influenced the more tactical day to day choices that you’re making?

Chris

Yeah, I think it really Dan, anybody that takes 4 hours, take 4 hours and go to a park or a meeting room or go somewhere that’s kind of nice and relaxing, and you write down, like, what you want the world to be like 500 years from now or 100 years from now and even 50 years from now. And when you kind of write that on paper and you get an idea from that, it makes the daily decision making easier, because if you know that is what your legacy and purpose is going to be, your decisions, like, it weeds out all the BS. It’s like something comes across your plate and it’s much easier to say, no, it doesn’t fit into this. It’s gone right again, getting back to cutting the fat. And again, it’s a practice. It’s a practice and a habit that we need to get into. But anybody will get I think if they just spend 4 hours to go off and write that stuff down on the Journal or piece of paper and get an idea of that, it will really help the reverse engineering for your business plan and your life plan, because too often what our primal brains want us to do is just like, what’s for the next three years?

Chris

What’s for the next three months? What’s for the next month? What’s for today? How do I feel today? Do I need this today? Do I need that today? But you engage. So the prefrontal cortex of our brains is strengthened by long term planning, and that’s also the manager and like the CEO of our other areas of our brains. So if an emotion comes up and you’re triggered, if you have a strong, healthy prefrontal cortex, it will stop and say, no, Chris, don’t do that, because it’ll lead to this, and that’ll be a bad result. And so a lot of impulsive decisions come from people that have weakened or prefrontal cortexes that haven’t grown or been strengthened over the years. One of the best things to do that is long term plan. When you longterm plan, you’re exercising that, and then it helps with the decision making on the back side of it. So it’s a whole reverse engineering process that deals with the neuroscience of our brain that makes it easier at the end of the day, so you don’t feel as overwhelmed and you feel more happy.

Dan

I love that. And thank you for the brain science behind it, because that makes just a ton of sense. And even it circles me back to that question I asked earlier about what to say no to and these things that like when to say no if I’m honest with myself and if I’m able to think in the longer term, this one project in particular, it’s like it pays the bills and everything. But longer term, I know it’s going to go, and I know that that’s not where I’m going to be spending my time. But what makes it hard is when I think in the opposite, when I think about, like, right now or making sure the bills are paid this month or whatever else, I think the emotional part of your brain when it’s guiding the process. And so I think that that’s really helpful, even just for me personally to challenge myself to make the choices based on the longer time frame. Thank you for that. But I also say that, like, Ouch, that kind of stings a little bit. I’ve got some good hard work ahead of me.

Chris

Good, man. Good. Yeah.

Dan

I know your brain science is kind of a sub specialty of yours. And I know on your side you have a portion about brain scans. And I’m really curious how just to learn to know more about that, I know that there are different brain wavelengths. I know that I have a muse headband that measures helps, you know, when you’re in a calm state. I feel like it’s mostly a pretty blunt tool, but it kind of gets in the ballpark, I hope.

Chris

Yeah.

Dan

But I think with the stuff that you’re doing is next level. Beyond that, I’m curious how much do you is actionable, I think, is really what it comes down to. Like, how can people know take the science of what’s going on in their brain, take a brain scan and then use that let that dictate their actions or use that data in their day to day life.

Chris

It’s huge. Like, the tech that we have now to understand what’s happening inside a person’s brain is I almost feel like we’re in a science fiction movie. So literally, like, we can put a brain scanner on a person’s brain and we can see if they have been concussed, literally. You could have had a concussion when you were two years old, knocked your head when you’re a little baby walking around, and it can still affect your life to this day. But in the past, we didn’t have the ability to scan those brains. That’s why a lot of this tech is devoted to kids that are playing sports, that are playing football or soccer and have knocked their heads around. Most of us guys that were little adventurous boys, we probably fell off our bike or got hit with a baseball or something. And there’s an actual valid possibility that can affect your life. It may be in your relationships and maybe in the way you manage your emotions, maybe the way that your brain communicates with one another, like having challenges in different areas. And so we didn’t know that prelike 10-15 years ago. And now, especially in the past, like ten years, the tech has evolved so much to where these devices can predict Alzheimer’s and dementia up to like 30 years ahead of time.

Chris

They can predict, like, if it wasn’t a physical concussion, if you did any brain damage through chemical drugs or alcohol and when you were younger or also emotional damage to the brain. So got involved in a toxic relationship, had a bad business partnership, failed. You just grew up in a really rough environment. All those things can affect the brain. The brain doesn’t fully develop for men until around 25. And women, excuse me, women around 25 and men around 27. So those guys have a little bit slower brains, which I think most people know. But yeah, and that is quite often pre 25 is when most of us do the Wilder adventures or sports or all the things in post 25. Most people kind of grow up and they don’t do that so much. And so when you get a brain scan, you can look into the Alpha, beta, Theta and Delta activity and brainwaves and how they’re operating. You can see the actual brain reaction voltage. You can measure your physical reaction time. You can measure your brain’s reaction time. You can measure even your heartbeat and your HRV connected to how your brain is functioning.

Chris

You get to see how the coherent connections in different areas of the brain. You get to see if the front part is communicating to the back part or where there are gaps in that communication. And very much like, if you want to increase your health, you need your physical health. You need to focus on your diet, and do some exercise. Right. It works even better if you know what diet to use, if you know what diet works for you. And if you know what exercise really is good to optimize your body and what those muscles to work out. If you want to get bigger, if you want to work on cardio, if you want to do martial arts or sports or whatever it may be, lose weight. And so this is what you can do with brain scans. Now, you can look inside a person’s brain. You can say, oh, there’s lack of functioning here. There’s fully functioning, optimized functioning here. Whether a proper neurologist or neuroscientist can tell you the activities that can help you re-optimize and heal the areas of the brain. May it be supplements or meditation or exercise during a certain amount of time of day, but whatever you need.

Chris

But with the brain scans, too, when you do brain scan, it’s very similar to taking a really good personality test. So if you had a brain scan. Well, for example, when I got my first brain scan, the doctors like Chris, I can tell you more of an emotional guy. You wear your heart on your sleeve, but you also work hard and you’re obsessed with your work and you have a hard time taking time off. And this is all from a brain scan, right. This is not like him knowing anything about me. And it really is the engine of our bodies and our lives. And if we’re getting good results or great results, it’s from good or great brain activity. And if we’re getting below average or bad results, it’s from below average or bad brain activity.

Dan

Wow. So much there. Yeah. To learn in a pack. And I guess just unaware of so much of this and especially about the healing part and gaps can be identified and then addressed. And I think that’s where it was kind of proving your site. And like, I don’t know what this would do for me. How do I take some data like this and put action behind it? Yeah. So just really amazing to see some of this. It’s cool to think again, thinking about the 100 years, 500 years out, how much more we’re going to know about what’s happening in our bodies and in our brains, from blood work, from brain scans, all these things like this, that I feel like we’re at the cutting edge in some ways of these things, becoming more consumer, having more consumer access to them. But hopefully we’ll continue to move in that direction, which will make for a more healthy and prosperous lives for everyone.

Chris

Which is I think we will. And it’s exciting to see. And especially like the tech development over the past 5-10 years, like an iPad. Was that even a household item five years ago? I don’t even know.

Dan

Right.

Chris

And now so many people have iPad.

Dan

Right. Everyone.

Chris

And so I think it will come to the point where it will Be. You know how they suggest getting a yearly check up with your doctor? I would imagine everybody should probably and it’s starting out. It’s better than later, but it’ll be the norm to get yearly brain scans and yearly blood work for sure. Maybe every six months.

Dan

Yeah, I love that. Yeah, I just had some blood work myself for the first time inside tracker and had all kinds of new things that I was like, had no idea that were going on and supplements in different directions to pursue it to help kind of fill those gaps. So now you’ve got me thinking about my brain and maybe need to schedule that one out next. I love it. Well, just as we move towards wrapping up, here one thing I always like to hear guests articulate in some ways, there was a message that you could send to everyone in the world. So I like to think of this as like if we could put a Billboard on the moon that everyone could read out their window, what would it say? What would you put on that Billboard?

Chris

Yeah, I would say your dreams — you have your dreams for a reason. And it could almost be selfish of you not to go after those because they’re given to you not only to help yourself and make your dreams come true, but to inspire others as well.

Dan

That’s so beautiful. I love it.

Chris

Thanks, man.

Dan

I’ll sign my name on that one. Let’s get that. I’ll help fund that Billboard on the message everyone needs to hear. So thank you.

Chris

We’ll get one on Mars, too, right? Why limit ourselves Dan, we’ll get one more moon and Mars.

Dan

That way when Elon Musk lands there, there will be a Billboard waiting for him to.

Chris

Yes, you’re like what’s up, Elon? You took too long, bro.

Dan

I love it. Well, folks listening. If they want to connect with you, follow up and follow along with what you’re up to. Is there anything specific you’d like to invite them to?

Chris

Yeah, the best place is thebusinessmethod.com for our podcast and Everything we do underneath that so you can check out the show, learn about the entrepreneur community, learn about optimizing brain, all the fun things or events as well.

Dan

I’ll make sure to link up to that in the show notes for everybody and thank you so much fun conversations. Great having you on the show.

Chris

Thanks, man. I appreciate you having me and it’s been great. Thanks, Dan.

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