Finding Common Threads and Integrating Different Parts Of Your Identity with Marlita Hill

Marlita Hill is a choreographer, educator, and author of multiple books. She has built an entrepreneurial practice at the intersection of faith and art. Her conversations and questions revolve around exploring ways faith and creativity can coexist for artists. 

Through her work, she supports artists in nurturing these parts of their identities together.

Marlita runs two programs — Nail That Niche and The Kingdom Artist Initiative — to empower artists in these ways.


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In this episode you’ll learn:

  • What Marlita does
  • Helping people understand the work that they do
  • Looking through the lens of a choreographer
  • Marlita’s journey into dancing and choreography
  • From idea to manifestation: a series of decisions
  • Understanding what you’re trying to build
  • Identity of your creation influences all decisions
  • The tornado brain and laying the initial foundation
  • Finding threads that tie your story together
  • Chart out the different things you do
  • Notice the integrations and how they feed into each other
  • Identifying themes and crossovers

Resources Mentioned:

Marlita’s website

Marlita’s Instagram

Software Generated Transcription:

Dan

Marlita. Thank you so much for joining me. Welcome to the Meaning Movement Podcast.

Marlita

Hi, Dan. Thank you so much for having me.

Dan

It’s so fun to have you here on the show. The question that I like to begin with is how do you begin to talk about the work that you do?

Marlita

And I love that question because that is actually part of the work that I do.

Dan

I like this already.

Marlita

It’s helping people understand how to talk about their work. For me personally, before I get into that. But for me personally, that has been a journey of me getting down to the essence of what it is that I do. So I am kind of an amalgamation of several things, which I think all of us are in this day and age. A lot of us are Slashers, right? So that depends on who I’m talking to and what context.

Dan

I like that Slashers. Like, I’m this. That slash that. I love it. That’s really good.

Marlita

The slasher generation good. When you write your next book and that’s the title, just credit me and just I will.

Dan

It’s so good.

Marlita

But essentially, I’m a choreographer and an educator in the kind of direct to it.

Dan

Yeah, I love it, I guess. What kind of manifestations what outlets do you focus on currently with your choreography and your education?

Marlita

Yes. Okay. So I’m a choreographer making dances. And then as an educator, I teach about art choreography, and then I’m also an author. So I work with people about getting clear about their work, who they serve, what their ideas are, what problems they solve, that kind of thing. And so I do that through a podcast and through books and speaking.

Dan

I love that this is where you can educate me a little bit about choreography. When you’re doing choreography, are you choreography? What’s the verb of that? Choreographing.

Marlita

Choreographing.

Dan

Are you creating movement choreographing for others or for yourself or for both?

Marlita

Both. And what’s interesting is I have realized that because I started off as a dancer, started off as a dancer, wrote one book, never thought I would write one book, then wrote multiple books. And then you know how generative that process can be. You’re continually expanding. But one of the things that I’ve discovered as I’ve worked on getting clearer about what it is that I do is that in all the things that I do, I think through the lens of a choreographer and that process of how you bring something from an idea to the stage, like a dance, from the idea to the stage. And all of the decisions that you have to make in that process is the same as creating a course, is the same as writing a book. It’s all the same thing that I do over and over again. So that’s what I love is that idea and all of the decisions that you have to consider from bringing something from an idea that’s nothing. And it’s just tornado brain with it. It’s all over the place to this finished product that’s designed and costumed and positioned. And I love that kind of work.

Dan

I love it. Well, I want to dig into that process because that’s fascinating to me. But before we get there, I want to maybe just rewind a little bit and just ask about your relationship with dance. And when did that begin? Where did that begin?

Marlita

So Interestingly. I never wanted to be an artist. I wasn’t even interested in being an artist.

Dan

Right.

Marlita

I actually wanted to be a psychologist. I was interested in psychology. And at 15 years old, I met a dance ministry called the Hush Company, and I danced with them for eight years. And when I was in that company, I realized, oh, I actually won. I’ve got a gift for this. And then I found out I had a passion for choreography and for teaching. And so from there, I went on and went to school, which was a nine year process for me to get into a bachelor’s program for dance, because I didn’t know that you had to know how to dance already in a particular way. Right. You had to know a particular style to get into College for dance. So that was a learning process. But then from there, I graduated and then went on to teach at a performing arts high school in Los Angeles. That’s where I really got to flex my wing as a program creator and as a choreographer. I started setting my own work outside of the school and outside of an academic setting more in the community and stuff. Then I put that down for a couple of years and started developing a program that I do with artists about their art and their faith and that relationship together.

Marlita

And then I was invited to graduate school, which I just finished in May. So now one of the other things I do is I teach at Bell Haven University in Jackson, Mississippi. Teach dance.

Dan

I love it. Very cool. Very cool.

Marlita

Yeah.

Dan

What a fun trajectory you’ve been on. Yeah, I’m curious. I want to ask this question about that process of bringing ideas to the stage and how you said, yes, that’s the same process that you use. Or maybe it’s we use, you could tell me for creating anything, bringing anything from concepts to reality. Maybe it’s a way to think about it. And I just want to hear you talk some more about that.

Marlita

So one of the things that I’ve discovered, and I’m interested to hear what you think about this, Dan. But one of the things that I’ve discovered, at least in the work that I do, is bringing something, a dance, a book, a business, from idea to, like, manifestation. It’s just a series of decisions, decisions you have to make and questions you have to answer. So in dance, it’s what is this dance about? How many dancers? How do they get on and off the stage? What’s the lighting going to be? What music am I choosing? What are they wearing? It’s just a series of decisions, and then it’s decisions, and then there are organizations, things that you organize. Right. Okay. What section goes here? What goes next? What is the sequencing of it? It’s the same thing that I do in writing a book. What is this book about? Okay. Who am I talking to? What aspect of this topic am I talking about? Those kinds of identity decisions. And then I get into the organizing. Okay. How do I bring my readers through the flow of this idea? What’s the sequencing of the ideas then to the publishing?

Marlita

How do I design the book? Right. How do I talk about it? What’s the title? What font am I using? All those kinds of things business. Same way. What is this business I’m creating? Who am I creating it for? What solutions do I solve? Right. Then on to is it going to be brick and mortar or online or both? Do I sell products or services? All of these are just decisions, and they’re the same kinds of decisions of identity and organization and then implementation that you do across the board. And so in that realizing that this process is all about making decisions, the work that I do in that is you need to have some information to help guide you in those decisions, because what it is that I’m making is going to guide and inform every decision I make in making it. Right?

Dan

Yeah.

Marlita

So I help people get clear about what is it that you’re actually creating and building, because that’s going to shape all of the decisions that you make.

Dan

What happens when someone doesn’t know, when they don’t know what they’re what they’re creating, or is that part of the work is having an understanding of it?

Marlita

That’s the work. And it’s interesting because that work is work in itself. That’s the reason that’s all I focus on with you is let’s get clear about what it is that you’re actually trying to build. And one of the things I think about is like, if you are trying to build let’s say, for instance, you know, you’re trying to build a greenhouse. Right. But I build amusement parks. Well, the information I’m going to give you to build an amusement park is very different from the information you need to build a greenhouse. And so you have to be clear about what it is. And so that’s what I focus on with people that I work with, whether it’s an artist, an author, or someone building their business. You have to be able to articulate that because you’re the only one that can determine whether any advice that’s given to you, any tools that you come across or strategies are right for what you’re trying to build.

Dan

That’s a great point. That not all tools are the right tools. Not all advice is the right advice that is very much dependent on where you’re going and what you’re trying to bring into the world. I love that it’s a helpful framework. Where do you feel just curious in your experience working with people on this? I think it’s so relevant because these are the same questions that listeners are asking about their work, that they’re trying to make some change or thinking about change often not sure what that change will be. They might have different ideas that they’re playing with. They’re trying to decide, should I go this way or that way? Should I change career? Should I change roles? Should I go back to school, et cetera, et cetera. But often we’re in these places, we don’t know what we’re creating, but we know we need to create something, I guess you could say, out of our work, out of our careers. I’m curious. Some of the common themes that you see emerging as people are entering into the conversation. What are the major obstacles that they have to overcome early on?

Marlita

Yeah. So there are a couple of things. One, I have people who have a lot of interests, very generative people, their ideas all over the place, and they seem to span a whole bunch of different areas. And so I talk about this tornado brain. I have an idea over here, and then I have an idea over here, and then I have this, and I want to create that. And then I want to. Right.

Dan

It’s like, you know me.

Marlita

Because I’m talking about me.

Dan

Yeah.

Marlita

We’re alike in that way for people like us. One of the things I think foundationally that we have to think about is one, what are things that I’m interested in and what are things that I’m trying to build a business. Right. This is just like, for instance, I love salsa dancing, but am I trying to create a business or a career around salsa dancing? No, that’s just something I love to do or even something that I’m good at. Right. So I think one of the initial foundational questions is what is it that you love to do versus what are you trying to build a business around? And sometimes those overlap and sometimes they don’t. Right. What’s just a hobby or recreational versus? I’m actually trying to build something on this.

Yes.

Marlita

And then two. Okay. This is just me, but I think you can build a business out of anything. I mean, who thought that fidget spinners would be as successful as they were or Silly string or Silly string or Goat yoga or all of these things. Do you know what I’m saying?

Yeah.

Marlita

For me, in my mind, it’s not a matter of is it possible? It’s a matter of finding out how it’s possible. Right. How it’s possible? What am I actually trying to do with it? Who are the people that this would be great with? And then with people who are kind of all over the place as well. What I find is there are generally like, I love Pamela Slim’s book, The Thread, which I think would be a really good book for your readers. It’s something about thread. It’s Orange and shame on me for not knowing it.

Dan

But I know exactly the one you’re talking about. I’ll link to it in the show notes. Yeah, I know it.

Marlita

Yes, that’s good. And Tamson Webster, her book, The Red Thread. Both of these women talk about threads. But one of the things that’s really interesting that Pamela Slim talks about is there are usually threads that tie these different interests together. So for me, for instance, I write, teach, speak, create about faith, art and entrepreneurship. We seem very different. But what I realized is one I’m doing the same thing in all of them. I’m an educator. I care about foundations. Right. I am in the beginning process of helping you clarify your work, who you are, who your audience is, no matter which audience I’m speaking to. So I’ve been able to find a thread that ties all those three together. Right? So that’s what I would say for people who are struggling, trying to get everything together. Like, am I trying to build six businesses? Am I building one? Do they all work together? And then I think the other thing just the biggest thing outside of that is confidence, because we’re like, how can I make money at this? You can. The process is finding the way to do that.

Dan

I love it. That’s so good that’s Pamela Sun’s book is Body of Work.

Marlita

Which is a body of work.

Dan

The subtitles Finding the Thread. I just Googled it here. While we’re discussing perfect finding the thread that ties your story together. That’s perfect. And it aligns so well with how you approach this conversation. Aligns so well with how I approach this conversation. One of my core beliefs is that when you’re doing work, that’s meaningful and that’s fulfilling in one area of life and in multiple areas of life. I guess you could say that you’re always participating in the same movement if you zoom out far enough that you can see that thread. Use that analogy. I often think of it like a Venn diagram. If you have these circles, the circles don’t seem to touch. But if you draw a circle that overlaps all of them, that’s your work. That’s the movement that you’re making. That’s what you’re doing in the world. You’re just speaking my language in so many ways.

Marlita

Oh, I love this. I love it. I love it. And it’s so important. And I think sometimes this deals with the overwhelm of trying to create work, as we realize at one point, Dan, I had, like four different websites that I was all managing poorly. I was just all over the place. And so for me, the last ten years has been about streamlining just my life and my work and what I do super important.

Dan

I love that. Well, again, you’re just kind of speaking my language. The question I’m always asking of myself is recently is how do I become more integrated? How do I bring more of these things together and be the same person or at least feel like I know I am the same person, but allowing myself to feel like I’m the same person. And in all these different places, when I’m on doing a podcast with the meaning of it and also have a software start up that I’m running and also have some short term rentals and real estate stuff that I’m doing, that all these things feel so different, but they all are me. But how do I bring them together? And I think even just moments like this, at least talking about them, at least I’m talking about them now in these different contexts, that’s a step towards it. But the question I’m always asking is how do I allow myself to be integrated, to bring these things that feel so desperate and separated and let them be one thing? So I’d love to hear even just more of your thoughts on how you’ve tackled that yourself.

Dan

So this is Dan self help hour where you help me solve my problem.

Marlita

That is so funny. I remember when I was having a conversation with an artist just really quickly and he said, Marlita, I need to talk to you because I think I can learn from you about making money as an artist. And I said — me? And I was like, I’m sitting in my bedroom in my mom’s house. So it’s like these are things that you’re constantly working through, right? Yes, because life is dynamic. Life is dynamic, and they’re constantly shifting. So this is funny. But one of those things that helped me is I went and I did just kind of like a chart for myself of what was I doing in each of these things. So, like, as a choreographer, what are the things that I do as an author? What are the things that I do? Like, what do I do? What do I write about? What turns me on about that? Why am I doing that? And I kind of made a chart and then I literally went and just circled. I am a firm believer of getting it out on pen and paper so that you can see it and then you begin to see relationships.

Marlita

And I would circle things like, oh, my God, this. And this is the same. Oh, I do that the whole way across. So just taking inventory of just each individual section of my life helped me find those threads, helped me create that little macro Vin diagram for myself. And then once I recognized it, then I was able to focus on something I could dive more deeply into. So, yeah, that’s kind of just a very practical way that I did it.

Dan

I love it. I love it. And I think for listeners who are in a similar place wrestling with these things, I think that’s a great exercise to do. I’m going to take the heart and spend some more time on even myself of just getting it all out there and thinking in these different categories. And what is the work that you’re doing in all of those? I’m curious for you, Marlina, how much does your work cross pollinate between these different iterations? How much does Marlita the faith and art thinker speaker and Marleita the artist, Marleta the entrepreneur? How much does you and each of those spaces, like, feed into each other? And how much is it separate? I don’t know if that’s the right question.

Marlita

But I want to hear no, it absolutely is. So there is a lot of crossover in different ways. So one of the things I say is like, okay, I write, teach and speak about faith, art, entrepreneurship. I do that in various combinations and separately. So again, I like visuals. So I did the chart. So if I’m just talking about dance, that’s choreography. But I also may be talking about dance or art and entrepreneurship. Right. So that’s something I might be talking about art and faith. That’s another program or art of faith and entrepreneurship or faith by itself or entrepreneurship by itself. And so once I was able to identify kind of the main ideas or themes that are present in my work, I also realized, oh, I’m crossing all over the place in various ways. Why did I write this book? Why am I interested in creating this program? Why did I build this course? Because these are the things I care about and this is what’s coming across. So I would say there’s a lot of cross pollination also because I think the same way. Like I said, no matter what I’m building, I realize I think through the lens of a choreographer in the choreographic process.

Marlita

So no matter who I’m speaking to, no matter what combination of those three things I’m doing, I’m thinking through that lens. No matter what area I’m working in, I’m leading people through the same process. I care about the same things. It’s just to a different segment, just to a different group of people. But no matter who those people are, I’m attracted to them for the same reason. And that is I want to help you lay a healthy foundation of being clear about who you are, what you’re trying to build. Right. And who you’re trying to serve with your work. Because, again, that information guides every other decision you make in trying to manifest or build it.

Dan

I love it. That’s fantastic.

Marlita

You know, if it took me ten years to be able to say that like that.

Dan

Yeah, that’s how you know it’s good. That’s how you know it’s real truth. Because it sounds so simple, like, of course, but no it’s not simple.

Marlita

And it is so hard to get to that simplicity when you don’t have a process. And that’s why I do the work that I do with people. So it took me ten years. So now it doesn’t have to take you ten years. You know what I mean?

Dan

That’s right. That’s where passion comes from, right? Like you’ve done that work, you’ve been through that pain, you’ve been through that struggle, and that’s why you do this exactly the same reason I do this work and have these conversations because I’ve struggled with these things for so long to feel like I was doing work that mattered to me and was on a direction that fit for me. And so I’m just doing all this work to try to save someone the pain that I’ve been through. We share that in common.

Marlita

Yes. And I was going to say for your listeners, I think all of us do in some respect, when you’re talking about finding meaning in your work, there is something that just kind of grabs at all of us. And I think the only difference between maybe you and I and someone else is we recognized that, and then we took the risk to move on that and explore what that was and see what we can make out of it. And so I think that’s something to really pay attention to for listeners who are making decisions. There’s something that has been scratching at your heart for a while that you might have dismissed because you didn’t think it was valuable or nobody else cared or you didn’t know. How could I do something with this? But those are all overcombable issues once you take the risk to pay attention to it.

Dan

I love that. I love how you articulate that with it, there’s something that grabs at all of us. I really believe that’s true. I’m curious how you think about people that I find sometimes in these conversations I describe what I do and that some people just kind of give me a blank stare. They don’t understand. If I said something, there’s something that grabs at all of you, and they’re like what you say to those people and then two how you think about them is it just that I don’t want to say us and them? Because that’s not at all my intent here. But I don’t know. I guess it feels like some people are awake in this conversation in a way that other people aren’t. But I’m curious how you think about it.

Marlita

I will tell you how I think about it in terms of somebody who’s creating something in it is I’m always working to figure out what language will help them understand. How can I make this more concrete, more simple? So that’s one of the things I think that we’re always forgetting, because you create something, right? You start a business, you write a book, you do whatever, and then you got to communicate and explain what that is to other people so they can catch the vision. But also in that there is this thing of doing that to a certain extent, because I’ve realized I’m looking for people who align with my work, not trying to convince people that my work is valuable.

Dan

Yeah, that makes a lot of sense.

Marlita

So in clarifying my language, I’m clarifying my language for the purpose of identifying who aligns with it for you. And I when you’re talking about finding meaning in your work, well, that’s going to resonate with people who feel dissatisfied with their work or are satisfied but want to identify what that meaning is so that language will make sense to people who are looking for what you do. There are people who just are not going to get it. Yeah. There are people who just are not going to get it, but they’re not your people. And that’s okay. Or they may not be in a season for you.

Dan

Yes. Not too long ago, I interviewed on the podcast, Mark Zhang, who is a founder of a sleep mask company, makes.

Marlita

Oh, wow.

Dan

Masks for sleeping. I was just talking about it, and I was releasing this new mask. Maybe I just don’t get it. How can you make a mask better? And he was like, the problem, Dan, is that you’re not my customers. I feel like very much a parallel to what exactly you’re saying is that’s exactly right? I would hope that I tried one of his masks. I would really understand it and feel the difference. What a sleep mask that goes over your eyes, the difference it could make. But it’s just not a struggle that I’ve had personally. And I think that it just resonates with exactly what you’re saying about the realm of work and meaning and purpose that you have to help the people that are looking for it. And the others, they’re fine. They don’t need it. And that’s okay. And they can be where they’re at. And there’s no problem with that.

Marlita

Yeah. And I think that is so important for us as creators to understand, especially when you’re trying to, like when you’re taking a risk.

Dan

Okay.

Marlita

So you’ve recognized, okay, this is something I want to move on. And then you start kind of trying to speak to people, to kind of validate and assess whether it’s a good idea or not. Well, one of the things that we discover is we are not for everybody. And I know people like to think, oh, this is something universal. It’s for everybody. And I’m like, no, it’s not. Nothing is ever for anyone. And so one of the things I talked about, you remember Ten Staffel and economics class, there is no such thing as a free lunch when I made my own Ten statement that there is no such thing as a universal soap. And what I mean by that house is what I say. So what I say about that is we would think that something like soap is a universal concept or some kind of agent that we use to cleanse ourselves is a universal concept? Yes, it is a universal concept. However, people who buy soap are not all buying soap for the same reasons. Some people are buying soap because they want it to match their decor. Some people are buying soap as a gift, so they want it in different shapes and ideas and that kind of thing.

Marlita

Some people want natural soaps with no dyes. Some people want perfume. The fragrance matters. So, yes, soap is a universal concept, or cleansing or an agent is a universal concept. But the people who engage in buying soap are not a universal audience. So which of those people are you making soap for?

Dan

I love that. That’s a great analogy. It’s perfect. Thank you for that. I want to hear you just share a little bit about how you approach the creative process and whether that be in any of the realms that you play in, whether it’s planning a workshop or starting to choreograph a new piece. Where do you start? Where does it begin for you? So you have the task. I’ve just hired you. I’ve just given you this opportunity that you said yes to. What happens next for you.

Marlita

Okay. The process starts in all different ways, but they’re in all different ways. In a few ways, I’ll say so sometimes I’ll say for dance, sometimes a lot of it starts with music. I’m randomly listening to music or you’ve hired me. And the first place I’m going to go is music, right? Because that’s what inspires me. Sometimes I’ll have an idea for something, you know, a theme, and I’ll just start sometimes I’ll go look up words because I need movement ideas, and words help me with movement ideas sometimes. And then it’s just a random collection of ideas that have no organization. I don’t know what the beginning is. I don’t know how it’s going to start, what part goes where. It’s just random steps. And the same thing when I’m writing a book or creating a course is I’m just capturing ideas that are coming to me on random pieces of paper in notebooks and just kind of all over the place. But I don’t have a question that I’m answering yet. So the first thing that I do when I’m writing a book or creating a course is I’m like, okay, what question am I trying to answer?

Marlita

Because I was talking to a friend about this, and I said, some of us have a question at first or something that we want to explore, and then information comes to do that, to answer that or address that. Some of us and others of us have random information, but we don’t know what that information belongs to. So our quest is to figure out what kind of unifies all of this information and then organize it so I think in the ways that I create, there’s the thing that stimulates me because I got to get the ideas kind of flowing. And then there’s the, okay, what is this? What kind of ties all these ideas together? And then there’s, okay, now how am I actually going to work this out? So with the book, it may be okay. How do I want to answer that? With the choreography? I’m figuring out, okay, what section goes next? How am I going to transition between do I want three dancers doing that or one dancer doing that? And then where on the stage do I want to do what direction do I so there’s all of those decisions that I have to start making, and then I just kind of like a mole in the dirt.

Marlita

You start in the dark and just kind of carve your way through until you keep digging. And then there’s this moment where it just all makes sense and then makes sense for a minute. And you think, I got it. No, you don’t. So it’s a messy process.

Dan

Yeah, I love it.

Marlita

It’s a messy, wonderful process that I love.

Dan

Yeah. It sounds like collecting. I hear a lot of collecting, organizing, connecting, and then maybe kind of iterating on that cycling around that.

Marlita

Yes.

Dan

It sounds like it is a messy process.

Marlita

It’s like you have a cycle and then you have kind of smaller cycles within cycles. Right. I love that you’re going back and iterating and doing things over again and reassessing. And then there’s the don’t forget about the editing and the revising. Yes, I love it. It frustrates me and I love it.

Dan

That’s great. I love it. It’s so good. As we just move towards wrapping up here, I think there’s a couple more kind of just to zoom out a little bit and think about where our listeners are coming into this conversation. Many of them are asking these kind of big questions of what their next step would be next thing, next, whatever it is, they want more movement, movement, maybe more movement, more meaning, more purpose, more fulfillment, those kinds of things. And a lot of them might feel a little bit stuck in that space. I’m curious if you have any words of encouragement or wisdom that you would want to offer just directly to listeners that might be in that kind of stuck. I’m not sure what to do next space right now.

Marlita

I would say two things. I honestly believe we are never unsure of what to do next. I believe it’s a confidence issue because this is something that’s been turning over in your heart and your spirit for a while. Right. So if I were to ask you if money was not an issue, what would you be doing? You could tell me rather quickly. You could even give me a series of things. So I think that we should not discount the role courage and confidence plays in that answer. Right. Cause you know what it is that stirring in your heart right now? So there’s that. And then the other thing is and I was going to say something else and it went, hopefully it comes back. But yes, that courage piece is just so huge because once you have the courage to sit and acknowledge it, then there’s the matter of finding the path. And I think the path becomes accessible to you because now you’re willing to acknowledge it. And that’s been something that’s been huge for me. You can find a way to do just about anything. Remember the fidget spinner?

Dan

Remember the fidget spinner? It’ll be a rallying cry.

Marlita

But I would say that’s the biggest thing. And then like I said, you will be able to find a way to make it work, because it’s not. Is it possible? It’s how do I make this possible?

Dan

Yeah.

Marlita

And then the other thing for me is something that’s been really helpful for me is thinking of my life in seasons. Right. So in this season, what’s possible? Like if you’re thinking practically about next steps, if I’m raising a small child, if I’m working 40 hours a week, there are certain things that are possible and accessible for me at this moment, and there are other things that are not. So I can be working towards a goal and what’s accessible and practical for me in this season. So, like, I had a friend who wanted to start a business, but she had two small children. And I don’t have children yet, but I was like SIS, in a couple of years, they go to school so you can have some more time to do. And so that was something that she was able to plan for and look for or look forward to. I mean, there are all kinds of things that affect our situation if it’s a matter of I want to start a certain kind of business, but I don’t have the money right now. Okay. Well, then the first thing we think about is what’s possible for me to get that in this season that I’m here.

Marlita

So working and thinking about our life in seasons is something that has been really helpful for me.

Dan

Yeah, I love that. That’s really fantastic. Thank you for that. Just as we move towards wrapping up here, first, I just want to say this has just been so fun. I feel like I could go on indefinitely with you because there’s so much more looking at the time. Like, shoot, I want to keep going.

Marlita

But we do need to find another way to talk.

Dan

Yes, exactly. So as I was starting in on that, I was like this piece of me just feel sad. But that’s okay. It’s been so fun having on the show. Thank you so much for this. It’s been so great for people who want to follow along more and connect with you or follow your work is there anything specific you’d like to invite people to?

Marlita

Yes. So I have a little audio mini course that I’d love for you to listen to and it’s called Nail That Niche and it talks about four questions that you need to answer to get clear about the work you do, the problems you solve, the people you serve. And that is important information, whether you’re writing a book or you’re thinking of a business that you want to create. Because again, that information guides and informs every other decision that you’re going to make and you can find that at  nailthatniche.com I love it perfect.

Dan

Well, I will make sure to link up to that in the show notes as well so people could just click right on through. Thank you so much for the time, the conversation. It’s been so fun, really love the work that you’re doing and so grateful for your time here today.

Marlita

Thank you for having me, Dan.

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