Your Life’s Work is a Work in Progress (and What that Means for What You Do Next)

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In 2001 Michael Hyatt wrote a book about the importance of internet privacy. The book talks about how marketers, spammers, government agencies, and hackers can use your information against you. Much has changed since 2001, but what has changed most is Michael Hyatt.

Today he’s one of the most successful bloggers around. He’s even written about the importance of writing and how blogging has changed his life and his career.

He’s said himself that he wouldn’t write the book today— not that the content isn’t helpful, but that his view of the internet has changed.  Privacy is not as important to him as it once was. Now he writes to connect and share with people— something he wasn’t doing in 2001.

It’s easy to forget that your life’s work is a work in progress.[tweet that]

Your identity is always growing and changing. Parts of you remain unchanged, while other parts grow and stretch.

Who you are today is not the same person that you will be 5 years from now. Similarly, you are not the same person you were 5 years prior.

Anyone in their early to mid twenties can testify to how quickly these changes takes place. You finish college and go home to your parent’s house to stay in your old bedroom. A room that once reflected so much of who you were now feels foreign. The posters on the walls no longer match who you are. The friends in the high school photos aren’t the ones you hold close today.

At 23, you’re not the same person you were at 18. At 30 you’re a very different person than you were at 25. At 50 you’re a different person than you were at 45.

It may be less pronounced as you age, but the truth is still there: you’re always growing and changing. [tweet that]

Your life’s work is also a part of your identity. Knowing your work is about knowing yourself and what you find most meaningful— and that will shift and change over time.

It’s unlikely that it will change completely— meaning has deep roots in your identity — but it may take different forms.

Michael Hyatt isn’t writing about internet privacy, but he’s still writing. He may not be trying to help people keep important things private, but he’s still trying to help people live better lives.

You cannot separate who you are and what you do. [tweet that]

There will be a consistent theme in your life’s work, but it will also always be growing and shifting.

Hold to the deep and meaningful parts of your work while simultaneously allowing for freedom, growth, exploration, and change.

PS- Thanks Michael!

Dan Cumberland is on a mission to push you into the places meaning, life, & work intersect. He is the author of The Meaning Manifesto. Read more about him here, and connect with him on facebook and twitter.

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