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Tools Archives - Page 3 of 7 - The Meaning Movement

Category "Tools"

This Guy Really Hates Me (how to take criticism)

- - Persistence, Tools

Sometimes you put your heart and soul into something that matters and someone else won’t be into it. Just because it’s meaningful to you doesn’t mean it’s meaningful to everyone else.

Though that’s easy to say, it’s much more difficult to implement.

You can’t make everyone happy. We all know that. But no matter what we do there are parts of us that want to make everyone happy! It’s maddening!

No matter what you make, some people will love it and others will hate it (unless you make pizza or cute animal gifs).

I recently got this comment on this blog post (Note: if you’re reading this out loud to your children (do people do that?), language ahead):

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Choose Your Story

Picture this with me: a large elephant chained to a small post in the ground.

Maybe you’ve seen a similar sight? It’s a powerful visual. Why would a large and powerful elephant be held captive by something so small and insignificant?

It’s because of what that elephant has come to believe about himself and that post. If you tie an elephant to a post when he’s young, he can’t get away. If you do this regularly while he grows, he’ll continue to believe that he can’t escape, no matter how large he becomes.

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Balancing Self Care and Hustle

- - Courage, Desire, Tools, Work

When I was a kid there was a time when no one could get enough of Tetris. It may have been the first truly addictive video game (later followed up by Mine Sweeper— raise your hand if you’ve spent your share of hours on either!). I remember being at family gatherings and my full grown uncles and teenage cousins would pull out their Game Boys and pop in the Tetris cartridge.

They were hooked.

The idea behind the game is simple, these blocks keep coming and you have to find ways to make them all fit. Sometimes there isn’t a perfect place for them and they stack up a bit. But if you’re good, you can catch up a few blocks later.

Re-framing Balance

I had a conversation with Rachael Ellison some time ago. She helps businesses become parent friendly and helps parents advocate for themselves in the workplace. In our conversation I asked her about the idea of work-life balance.

She replied simply, “No. There is no balance.” And went on to talk about other metaphors that are better suited for the struggle.

She mentioned the game of Tetris.

There are times when you have to work more than you should. And there are times when you have to do other things more than you want to. There are times when the blocks stack up and you have to trust that you’ll catch up a few blocks later.

Playing Tetris With Your Life

For the past two months I’ve been struggling through the transition from hospitalization to home life. Everything came crashing down on me two months ago with an emergency surgery. It was as if life put up a road block and said, “you have to stop everything.”

And stop everything I did.

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The Three Big Obstacles to Finding Purpose

I often ask people what obstacles and challenges they face as they work toward meaning in their lives. Though the answers come in many shapes and sizes, they boil down to three issues:

1) Knowing What to Do Next. People often feel overwhelmed by options and possibilities and feel a lack of clarity as to what to do when they have time to do something. Overwhelm is major issue in this search, and trying to decide what you should do next is a major contributor to that feeling of overwhelm.

2) Accountability. People often feel alone in the process. Some of us are asking different questions about life, work, and ourselves than anyone else we know— which can feel very isolating. We hear ourselves say things like, “If only I had a group of like minded people who understood what I am looking for and were trying to do something similar themselves.”

3) Time. People often feel like they don’t have the time to pursue meaning because they have too many other responsibilities. Work, family, friends, etc. can take up our time and energy to leave us worn and depleted.

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The Four Phases of Your Life’s Work (Which Describes You?)

- - Finding Your Work, Tools, Work

When I go on hikes, there’s this odd thing that happens. On the way in everything moves slowly. Everything is brand new. The trail twists and turns and every turn brings a new view and a new terrain to traverse.

This is some of the fun of hiking: you get to see new places. But it also is where some of the challenge comes into play. I know roughly how long the hike may be, but I don’t know how far I’ve come or how far I have to go. When it’s late in the day, your pack is weighing on you, you’re hungry, and almost out of water— the joy of the journey is often replaced by an anxious impatience to arrive. I just want to sit down, take my pack off, catch my breath, take off my boots and relax.

But then on the way back down the trail everything seems to move much more quickly. I remember aspects of the terrain. I recall that we crossed a bridge at about half way. I know that the steep section is only so long and that soon we’ll be past it.

The same experience happens on long runs or bike rides.

Once you’ve walked the path before, you have a frame of reference for where you are and what comes next.
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