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Desire Archives - The Meaning Movement

Category "Desire"

How to Create Sustainable Momentum Toward Your Goals

- - Desire, Goals, Purpose, Tools, Work

There has been some confusion in our house lately around two different words. Whenever my 1 year old sees a picture of a goose, we usually tell him it’s a goose and that it says “honk”. Honk, it seems, sounds very similar to a word he’s an expert in— bonk. So, instead of mimicking the goose sound, our little guy leans forward and bangs his head against the book. We should probably clear this up for him, but in the mean time, it’s really funny.
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The Psychology of Regret and How to Overcome It

Someone asked me the other day if there’s anything I wish I would have known before starting the Meaning Movement.

That’s a tough question to answer. If she’d asked if there are things I would have done differently, I would have had quite a list:

  • I would invest in a good plugin to run opt-ins sooner.
  • I would have started asking people who are making it work online for help sooner.
  • I would have gotten some coaching sooner.
  • I would have honed my title writing skills sooner.
  • Etc.

But I didn’t know that I needed any of those things. How could I? I was doing the best that I could with what I had to work with.

Which is exactly what we always have to do.

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How to Find Your Future (with the help of Google)

The internet is like a time capsule. When something is created and put on the internet, it’s there for everyone to see at any point in the future.

If I googled your name, what comes up? What’s the story that the internet tells about you, your work, and your life?

Maybe I’d see some blog posts you’ve written. Maybe I’d find some photos of you. Maybe I’d see your social media profiles.

Search engines show a snapshot of your past.

But imagine with me for a moment if you could google your future.

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Degrees of Variation (a year in review)

In the beginning of September, a few friends put together a party for my wife and I. We gathered in a friend’s backyard with lots of great food, drink, and many of our favorite people. We called it a “baby party” because I had an aversion to the idea of a “baby shower” (though I’m sure it was similar in many ways). A few friends offered words of blessing and hope for us as we transitioned into parenthood.

One of those friends who shared had been through a very rough transition to parenthood. Her son was born prematurely and they spent the first few months of his life in the infant intensive care unit at the hospital. She talked about how we have hopes for what things will be like and that sometimes life offers variations between our hopes and the events that come.

And other times there are many degrees of variations between our hopes and reality.

Her words stuck with me because I knew her experience and I knew how she’d lived through many degrees of difference from the way she had hoped things would go.

Her words became even more poignant when less than one week later, with my wife 33 weeks pregnant, I was on the operating table as surgeons literally took my intestines out and put them back in (I still can’t even believe it).

This was very different from how I had hoped the weeks leading up to parenthood would go. There were many degrees of variation.

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Balancing Self Care and Hustle

- - Courage, Desire, Tools, Work

When I was a kid there was a time when no one could get enough of Tetris. It may have been the first truly addictive video game (later followed up by Mine Sweeper— raise your hand if you’ve spent your share of hours on either!). I remember being at family gatherings and my full grown uncles and teenage cousins would pull out their Game Boys and pop in the Tetris cartridge.

They were hooked.

The idea behind the game is simple, these blocks keep coming and you have to find ways to make them all fit. Sometimes there isn’t a perfect place for them and they stack up a bit. But if you’re good, you can catch up a few blocks later.

Re-framing Balance

I had a conversation with Rachael Ellison some time ago. She helps businesses become parent friendly and helps parents advocate for themselves in the workplace. In our conversation I asked her about the idea of work-life balance.

She replied simply, “No. There is no balance.” And went on to talk about other metaphors that are better suited for the struggle.

She mentioned the game of Tetris.

There are times when you have to work more than you should. And there are times when you have to do other things more than you want to. There are times when the blocks stack up and you have to trust that you’ll catch up a few blocks later.

Playing Tetris With Your Life

For the past two months I’ve been struggling through the transition from hospitalization to home life. Everything came crashing down on me two months ago with an emergency surgery. It was as if life put up a road block and said, “you have to stop everything.”

And stop everything I did.

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